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IDE cables and hard drives...?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by crEA-tEch, Feb 21, 2004.

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  1. crEA-tEch

    crEA-tEch Thread Starter

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    I'm using IDE cables

    >>one with my hard drive and dvd rom connected to it...
    >>The other with another hard drive and a cd-writer connected to it..

    I've heard that having both hard drives one one cable makes them run faster than having them seperate?

    If so, by how much faster?

    Thanks in advance

    crE
     
  2. dbn

    dbn

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    It is true, but I can't tell you by how much. The speed is picked up by information transfering back and forth to each hard drive. If you are just trying to speed up your PC some, I don't think this is the answer that you are looking for. Speed in that case is coming from the processor, bus, memory, etc. That type of speed does not apply to the speed of data transfer from one hard drive to another.
     
  3. crEA-tEch

    crEA-tEch Thread Starter

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    Oh I dont mean that kind of speed, I have enough knowledge to realise that... I meant the speed at which data is written to and from the hard drive(s).

    crE
     
  4. milomorai

    milomorai

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    it is faster but you will not notice the difference. most hdd's are udma66-133 while optical drives are almost all udma66. data will transfer at the rate of the slowest udma on that ide bus. since hdd's are still not capable of overloading even an udma66 connection, i wouldn't worry about it.
     
  5. LONGHAIR

    LONGHAIR

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    I think you guys have it backward.

    The best configuration is to put each device on a separate channel through the use of a third IDE/ATA channel. If only two channels are available, it is generally best to put the fastest drive as a single device on the primary channel, the second hard disk as the master on the secondary channel, and the ATAPI as the slave on the secondary.

    This gives a clearer "path" with less congestion on "single" channel set-up.

    That being said, That is not how "I" do it. I have my Hard drives on the same channel and my CD-RW as the master of the secondary channel. I am more concerned with speed there that between the hard drives.
     
  6. Courtneyc

    Courtneyc

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    Actually, I think the idea crE is going for is to be able to write to both hard drives at the same time. This he accomplishes.

    However, he blew the speed thing when he put the CD drives on the same cable as the hard drives. Now, both drives are effectively only as fast as the CD drives' interfaces.

    To get the best speed, either have the drives on channels by themselves, or do what Longhair suggests.

    In your case, with two CD drives, put both HDDs on the same channel, and both CD drives on the same channel.

    courtney
     
  7. cnimbus

    cnimbus Banned

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    crEA-tEch,

    The way you currently have your drives connected sound pretty good to me. The important thing is to use 80-conductor cables on both IDE channels.

    In times past, putting both hard drives on the same cable often would make them run faster. Older IDE controllers used the same timing for all of the devices on a given IDE channel. This meant that if two devices were connected to the same cable, both drives' interface ran at the speed of the slowest device. Since the slowest device was usually the CD-ROM, the rule of thumb was not to connect CD-ROMs and hard drives together on the same cable. This is no longer holds true for newer systems, however.

    All of the more recent IDE controllers feature independent device timing. This means that the interface speed of the two drives connected to an IDE cable is now independent of one another. A slower device will no longer slow down a device with a faster interface.

    Another factor affecting data I/O rates is device contention. This occurs when the computer tries to access both drives connected to a given IDE cable at the same time. Since only one drive can access the channel at a time, there will be a delay. This is why Longhair's suggestion of connecting one device per IDE channel might result in faster hard drive operation.

    Note that if both the DVD-ROM and the CD-writer are are moved to the same cable, device contention will likely result when doing a direct CD-to-CD copy, causing problems. For this reason, CD/DVD-ROMs and writers are often connected to different IDE channels.
     
  8. SacsTC

    SacsTC

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    Note that if both the DVD-ROM and the CD-writer are are moved to the same cable, device contention will likely result when doing a direct CD-to-CD copy, causing problems. For this reason, CD/DVD-ROMs and writers are often connected to different IDE channels.
    With the software and chipsets available today, this is no longer a problem
     
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