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IDE VS all others.

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by courtlandhui, Jan 26, 2006.

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  1. courtlandhui

    courtlandhui Thread Starter

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    What's the difference between:
    IDE
    SATA
    SCA
    SCSI
    I was looking at ebay, and got all confused!
     
  2. jiml8

    jiml8 Guest

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    Short version. IDE is (was) the most common interface standard in PC-class computers. Also known as ATA. The standard is fairly dumb (meaning it doesn't do a lot of optimization processing on its own). It is moderately fast, very common, and very cheap. IDE drives have problematic reliability.

    SATA is serial ATA, a derivative/descendant of IDE. It is faster, and it is becoming the new standard in PC class computers. Still fairly dumb. I won't comment much on reliability; the standard is pretty new.

    SCSI is a standard that is older than IDE. It is not native to the PC class computers, but has migrated downstream from larger workstation environments. It was the original standard used by the Macintosh. It is the fastest standard, the smartest standard, and the most reliable and robust standard. SCSI hard drives tend to be very reliable. It is also roughly quadruple the cost of IDE. Myself, I always use SCSI; my data is far more valuable than the price difference between SCSI and IDE. You cannot just plug a SCSI drive into a PC-class computer; you have to put a SCSI controller card in, and a good card costs some serious money.

    SCA is a variant of the SCSI interface that is commonly used in hot-swap drive systems.
     
  3. courtlandhui

    courtlandhui Thread Starter

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    wooh thanks, i guess people will be sticking w/ ide, since its easy to install :-D
     
  4. SacsTC

    SacsTC

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    The p4s8x supports sata as well as ide. There are two sata connectors on the mobo. However, the power supply in that machine probably doesn't have sata power plugs so an adapter cable would be required.
     
  5. Hillian

    Hillian

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    is it possible to have 2 sata drives and an ide drive running off the same pc?I ahve 2 160gb sata's and a 80gb ide...and i wanna know if i can use them all together?

    i dont have the sata's set up in raid>there seperate drives
     
  6. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    You can have any combination of IDE/ATA/PATA, SATA, SCSI running in the same PC if you wanted to. If the motherboard doesn't have the interface then you can add in a PCI card, as you would need to get SCSI. IDE/ATA/PATA and SATA co-exist in every new motherboard in production right now. You can also have several different RAID arrays going at the same time even mixed together with single drives.
     
  7. courtlandhui

    courtlandhui Thread Starter

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    so, what's better, ATA/IDE or SATA? And which one's cheaper (regular price)?
     
  8. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    SATA has a slight lead over ATA and that lead is only growing. Prices do vary but are quite close, there's virtually little to no difference in pricing. SATA is now in its second generation. SATA II or 3Gs/s as its called has a higher interface speed, Native Command Qeueing, hot swapping, and its where most of the developement is now occuring. Both generations of SATA offer better cabling then PATA. PATA is on its way out.
     
  9. Hillian

    Hillian

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