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Install XP on separate disk to preinstalled Vista for dual boot - no vista dvd

Discussion in 'Windows Vista' started by Marty McFly, Jul 30, 2007.

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  1. Marty McFly

    Marty McFly Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2007
    Messages:
    2
    I would like to........wait for it..........

    'Install XP on a separate disk to preinstalled Vista for dual boot - with no Vista DVD'

    There, I think that says it all. I bought the HP Pavillion dv9000 with Vista preinstalled - no installation CD or anything, just a partition for emergency recovery. Now, I do a lot of music technology and there are so many hardware/software issues regarding audio that I would like to have a seperate XP os to boot into for this purpose.

    The question is: can this be done without a Vista installation disc? After all, why would I have the disc when it is preinstalled? And no, I dont want to have to download it from a cheap torrent site.

    -I have the second HD for XP
    -I have my old XP installation disc and registration
    -I can disable SATA from the BIOS
    -I can get the XP drivers for the laptop (it used to ship with XP, if I am correct)

    Please help, I seem to be spending most of my life trying to configure the damn thing than being productive.
     
  2. HP retiree

    HP retiree

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    My HP Pavilion that came with Vista, didn't do what my XP did nicely, although with much better hardware. I'm an artist/photographer, now, so mostly use Photoshop and Painter,
    and preferred XP, which worked nicer with my color management. Here's what I did, and
    hope this helps anyone else after all the web searching I did and found this entry. Decided to register to post a reply, thinking better late than never.

    With the decline in HDD prices, I got a Western Digital 500GB disk to put XP on to dual boot with the existing 500GB Vista. Don't plan on using the WD data Lifeguard software, but you won't need it. The new drive had only the flat SATA for power connection, but the Hitachi it came with had Molex, also for power. Since the PC had only 1 SATA power plug, daisy chained with 2 other molex, I switched them and have both discs together (or you can buy an adapter). You may also need to supply an SATA cable as mine came with none, but WD can tell you from your order number. Now with 2 disks, I booted Vista and using the Disk Management screen (control panel>administrative tools>compuer management>disk management) you can find your blank disk and format it by right clicking on it. Easy enough.

    Now boot the XP install CD. This was easy with my BIOS, ESC, for boot device choice.
    But first, to avoid SATA problems using F10 for SETUP, use the advanced tab and change
    the SATA property to IDE. LOTS easier than F6 later, and finding the right driver, or to slip stream it in. I was REALLY glad I found that elsewhere. Also found to use F5 instead of F6when prompted and change the default HAL (hardware access layer) to ACPI multiprocessor (or whatever you have) and the install will be smoother. My default was standard PC with C-step-i486, and you need to arrow up/down the list. You can also set boot device order now or later, but then just boot the CD and install. Once all the files
    are transferred, it will reboot, and this is then going to the disk. You don't need to change the boot device, but just don't hit any key if it tries to go to CD/DVD first. I did all this with just the new blank HDD, to avoid any problems, but there really shouldn't be any. Unplugging an SATA cable can be done hot anyway, and it was so convenient.

    Once XP is all installed and booted, my Vista boot used to be on C: (with a recovery partition D, thanks to HP), and the blank disk was and still is F, when booted with both.
    When XP is booted, it becomes the C drive, and the Vista disk shows as D and E. My DVD, which Vista showed as E, XP now sees as N. (mine came with all the memory cards slots)
    No need to do anything for dual boot purposes, software wise. Just choose with Esc
    for boot choice on power up through BIOS.

    I had also looked into the dual boot articles (Vista then XP / XP then Vista), into Virtual PC, and VMware etc., but this actually seemed like the best solution to me. Some of Vista
    will never do what XP did nicely, but some of it is pretty nice, so I can pick and choose
    between them now. By the way, if using OneCare, it sees both disks as different PCs,
    though in the same box. I have a home networked (wirelessly) older XP PC, in my studio, so it's also seen by One Care.

    Best wishes and if you plan ahead, hope this helps anyone. Glad seraching the web is
    still a great way to learn, and share info.
     
  3. HP retiree

    HP retiree

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    My HP Pavilion that came with Vista, didn't do what my XP did nicely, although with much better hardware. I'm an artist/photographer, now, so mostly use Photoshop and Painter,
    and preferred XP, which worked nicer with my color management. Here's what I did, and
    hope this helps anyone else after all the web searching I did and found this entry. Decided to register to post a reply, thinking better late than never.

    With the decline in HDD prices, I got a Western Digital 500GB disk to put XP on to dual boot with the existing 500GB Vista. Don't plan on using the WD data Lifeguard software, but you won't need it. The new drive had only the flat SATA for power connection, but the Hitachi it came with had Molex, also for power. Since the PC had only 1 SATA power plug, daisy chained with 2 other molex, I switched them and have both discs together (or you can buy an adapter). You may also need to supply an SATA cable as mine came with none, but WD can tell you from your order number. Now with 2 disks, I booted Vista and using the Disk Management screen (control panel>administrative tools>compuer management>disk management) you can find your blank disk and format it by right clicking on it. Easy enough.

    Now boot the XP install CD. This was easy with my BIOS, ESC, for boot device choice.
    But first, to avoid SATA problems using F10 for SETUP, use the advanced tab and change
    the SATA property to IDE. LOTS easier than F6 later, and finding the right driver, or to slip stream it in. I was REALLY glad I found that elsewhere. Also found to use F5 instead of F6when prompted and change the default HAL (hardware access layer) to ACPI multiprocessor (or whatever you have) and the install will be smoother. My default was standard PC with C-step-i486, and you need to arrow up/down the list. You can also set boot device order now or later, but then just boot the CD and install. Once all the files
    are transferred, it will reboot, and this is then going to the disk. You don't need to change the boot device, but just don't hit any key if it tries to go to CD/DVD first. I did all this with just the new blank HDD, to avoid any problems, but there really shouldn't be any. Unplugging an SATA cable can be done hot anyway, and it was so convenient.

    Once XP is all installed and booted, my Vista boot used to be on C: (with a recovery partition D, thanks to HP), and the blank disk was and still is F, when booted with both.
    When XP is booted, it becomes the C drive, and the Vista disk shows as D and E. My DVD, which Vista showed as E, XP now sees as N. (mine came with all the memory cards slots)
    No need to do anything for dual boot purposes, software wise. Just choose with Esc
    for boot choice on power up through BIOS.

    I had also looked into the dual boot articles (Vista then XP / XP then Vista), into Virtual PC, and VMware etc., but this actually seemed like the best solution to me. Some of Vista
    will never do what XP did nicely, but some of it is pretty nice, so I can pick and choose
    between them now. By the way, if using OneCare, it sees both disks as different PCs,
    though in the same box. I have a home networked (wirelessly) older XP PC, in my studio, so it's also seen by One Care.

    Best wishes and if you plan ahead, hope this helps anyone. Glad seraching the web is
    still a great way to learn, and share info.
     
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