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Installing RAM

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Farmgirl22, Jan 17, 2007.

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  1. Farmgirl22

    Farmgirl22 Thread Starter

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    OK, I'm going to have my mom pick up some RAM for her computer on her way home from vacation so that I can put it in.

    So my question is, will there be instructions with the RAM that tell how to install it? And if not, what do I do to put it in? Do I have to take the old ram out? Or do I just add to it? The specs are:

    Gateway
    Microsoft XP Home Edition
    Service Pack 2
    Intel Pentium 4 CPU
    1.80 GHz, 1.80 GHz
    128 MB of RAM
    Local Disk C: has 19.0 GB and 12.1 GB are free
    File System NTFS (whatever THAT means)

    The thing is running super slow, doesn't have any visible spyware or anything, the hard-drive as you can see is pretty empty, so someone suggested putting in more RAM. Any suggestions on brand? I looked at CompUSA and found some made by Kingston(?) that supposedly is compatible with the computer.

    I also visited a site that supposedly runs a scan on your computer to determine the correct brand or version or whatever (www.crucial.com), so that they can sell you their version...I think the one I found at CompUSA matches the one they recommended.
     
  2. Enbee

    Enbee

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    hi farmgirl...

    first of all, no, there won't be instructions with the RAM...

    secondly, if you have never opened up a computer, you need to know that it is not
    like opening a hood on a car. you stand to risk destroying your board by static electricity if you are not very careful. Although it might cost a few bucks to take to a shop, it might be worth it, if you don't know what you are doing.

    But... if you do want to do this.... then, your computer should have a manual ... and in the manual there should be diagram of your motherboard, as well a description of the type of memory that your computer uses.

    MAKE SURE THAT YOU GROUND YOURSELF BEFORE TAKING OUT THE OLD MEMORY OR PUTTING IN THE NEW.

    Depending on the motherboard, the computer make, etc... will depend on how much ram to put in, whether you can add to what is there, or take it out and only put in the new. Again, you should find this info in your manual. And again, if in doubt, take the computer to a repair shop.

    Good luck
     
  3. Farmgirl22

    Farmgirl22 Thread Starter

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    How do I ground myself?? I"ve fired up the humidifier so that static electricity won't be as much of a problem, but I'm still scared it might come in contact with the motherboard and stuff. Are you suggesting that I sit on the floor? Would that make me grounded? Like maybe a tile or linoleum floor or what? Sorry, I guess I sound kinda dumb asking these questions, but I don't want ignorance to mess everything up.
     
  4. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    All you have to do to ground yourself with the computer is UNPLUG IT FROM THE WALL, then after you open it make sure your bare skin like your forearm is touching bare metal such as the powersupply case before touching anything else inside the computer. this will effectively eliminate the static charge that may be stored on your body while you are working in the computer case.

    Remember anytime you do any work such as adding, removing, conncting, or disconnecting any components inside your computer case unplug the computer from any power source (the wall) before doing any of this.
     
  5. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

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    Does your mom know what kind of RAM to pick up?
     
  6. Old Rich

    Old Rich

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  7. Farmgirl22

    Farmgirl22 Thread Starter

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    Yrah, I gave her the exact numbers/specs of everything, so if she gets the wrong one....well, it would be pretty hard to get it wrong.
     
  8. Old Rich

    Old Rich

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    Mothers never get it wrong!
     
  9. Enbee

    Enbee

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    how did it go? any problems, or successful and smiling? :D
     
  10. Farmgirl22

    Farmgirl22 Thread Starter

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    Well...I dunno, I haven't gotten to do it yet. Mom didn't get the parts on her way home from Barrett-Jackson like she was supposed to, and I haven't been back over there recently to see if she's gotten it. I read through the stuff, and it seems to be pretty straightforward, so I'm pretty confident it will work when I do it. Which reminds me, I should probably call her and ask when she wants me to do that. Thanks Enbee for reminding me!!
     
  11. Enbee

    Enbee

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    no prob farmgrl... :)

    just remember to touch the unpainted metal of your case to ground yourself before doing anything in your computer...

    - then push open the plastic releases at either end of the memory sticks to take them out.
    - when you put the new stick in, make sure it is in the right direction... (you will see a small slot on the memory that will fit accordingly into the slot on the motherboard)
    - push it in firmly until you feel it snap in
    - then close the plastic releases on both ends.

    Also.... do not do this while on carpet, as that tends to increase your chances of creating static electricity.

    Good luck!! ;)
     
  12. BlueBelton

    BlueBelton

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    Hi,

    I agree about grounding (or earthing as we say in the UK) but I am trying to understand how that can be done by touching the bare metal of an unplugged computer. Sure, unplugging is a good safety tip for the person but it means that the discharged static has nowhere to go (PCs are usually mounted on rubber feet) so the circuit won't be completed and the electricity won't go to earth / ground.

    It is a better idea to touch some metal which does go to ground - eg a copper water pipe (assuming no plastic pipes in the route) - or buy a wrist strap and attach that to some grounded metal.

    I confess I do not unplug PCs from the mains when working on them - this way the case is earthed. However, this is potentially hazardous and I cannot and do not recommend it to anyone else.

    PS Yes dry air and carpets are wonderful producers of static.

    I'd simply buy the wrist strap!

    BB.
     
  13. dustyjay

    dustyjay

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    When you do this touching of Bare Metal you are really not grunding yourself. What you are doing is making yourself and the computer case the same Potential. Being the same potential means that there is not likely to be any flow of static electricity after that. When using a wrist strap you really want it to be attached in someway to the computer case for the same reaswon you are bringing your self and the computer case to the same potential so that there will be no static discharge. When you touch a metal water pipe as you said you are discharging any static charge but you must remember that as soon as that happens and you start moving back to work on your computer you are again immediately building a static charge again. THe chances are slim that you would cause damage due to Electro- Static - Discharge (ESD), bu tthe potentialo is there just the same. And it does occur from time to time. Especially in dry hot climates. Or in houses during the winter that use Central heating and the humidity is low. Better to safe all the tim ethan to be3 sorry once is my way of thinking. And the fact that an AntiStatic Wrist Strap is only like $7 at Radio Shack it makes sense to me.
     
  14. BlueBelton

    BlueBelton

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    Hi Dustyjay,

    Thanks for that. Yes I agree - I, too, am a fan of those anti-static wrist straps (available in the UK from PC World and just about any other computer shop and on-line - buy it with the new component).

    The grounding onto the (bare metal) computer (inner) case can only happen if the computer remains plugged into the mains - and, hence, is connected to the building's mains earthing - that's what I meant there. Else, no, the static does not go away anywhere. But again, I am not recommending that for anyone else - it could be dangerous. (Though I have survived doing it for a couple of decades).

    Dryness does mess up the atmosphere's ion flow and production and static develops. Also don't wear too many artificial fabrics - they often create static.

    As you say damage is unlikely but does happen and is then costly.

    BB
     
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