Installing XP?

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midlandman

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I'll be getting the FULL version of WINXP,and was told to install it right over WIN98.Is this OK to do? Or should I format first?Thanks for any help I can get on this.
 

JohnWill

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You can install it without formatting, but I don't recommend an upgrade install over W98. A clean install is best. I'd consider killing off the Windows directory, the Program Files directory, and then doing the install. Even cleaner would indeed be a format and install...
 

midlandman

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Thanks for your reply John!
I think the best way to go would be to format.
Do you know what the DOS prompt would be?ie...c:\format\S?...along those lines???
 

JohnWill

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When you boot the XP CDROM, you can format the partition as part of the install process, probably the easiest way to go. FWIW, if you boot from a DOS disk, it's FORMAT C:.
 
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I have installed XP many times in our lab at work.

I can tell you that by far the best way to install it is to boot to CD-ROM, format the C: partition (primary partition) with the NTFS file system and install away.

You can have other partitions in FAT32 if you like but NTFS is superior and gives much better control over your file system (i.e. it is recommended for the primary partition where Windows is installed).
 

JohnWill

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Originally posted by Monstrous Mi:
I have installed XP many times in our lab at work.

...

You can have other partitions in FAT32 if you like but NTFS is superior and gives much better control over your file system (i.e. it is recommended for the primary partition where Windows is installed).
I'd like an example of where FAT32 or NTFS will make any difference for the typical home user. In point of fact, there are still a lot of recovery tools that are only useful with FAT32, which tilts the scale in it's favor IMO. For a server, NTFS makes a lot of sense, since you can dole out permissions a lot easier than with FAT.
 
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NTFS advantages:

1. You can assign file security directly to folders or files. This can be useful if you want to protect access from children, teenagers, houseguests or other temporary users of your computer.

2. You are more likely to have success at recovering files on an NTFS volume since it keeps track of transactions.

3. It is a lot easier to work with encrypted files since it is transparent to the user when using the Encrypted File System (EFS).

4. NTFS performance doesn't suffer when the number of files on a partition increases. Ever try to start up Windows Explorer when a drive has several tens of thousands of files?

I've been reading your posts johnwill so it puzzles me that you would recommend FAT32 over NTFS.

I do work in the area of computer security so I may have a slanted view of FAT32. However, I bring home a lot of my security techniques for my own PC and those of my friends. I personally wouldn't even consider FAT32 doe Win2K or XP.
 
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NTFS advantages:

1. You can assign file security directly to folders or files. This can be useful if you want to protect access from children, teenagers, houseguests or other temporary users of your computer.

2. You are more likely to have success at recovering files on an NTFS volume since it keeps track of transactions.

3. It is a lot easier to work with encrypted files since it is transparent to the user when using the Encrypted File System (EFS).

4. NTFS performance doesn't suffer when the number of files on a partition increases. Ever try to start up Windows Explorer when a drive has several tens of thousands of files?

I've been reading your posts johnwill so it puzzles me that you would recommend FAT32 over NTFS.

I do work in the area of computer security so I may have a slanted view of FAT32. However, I bring home a lot of my security techniques for my own PC and those of my friends. I personally wouldn't even consider FAT32 for Win2K or XP.
 

midlandman

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Thanks for the input guys...but I have another little problem now.
I formatted with the 98 startup disk.But when I tried to install the XP,all I kept getting was "Cannot run program in DOS mode",or something along those lines.The I tried to boot from the CD-ROM,but all I got was ""Cannot read drive-insert another disk and press any key"...then it said something to do with "I/O".
I got fed up and re-installed 98 again.
Any ideas on how to get XP to install?A friend said I needed to change something in the "BIOS".
Any help I can get on this would be great!Thanks.
 
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Is the WindowsXP disc a copy? Because if it is, it sounds like whoever made the copy did not make it a bootable CDR.

Also, as far as the BIOS goes, you need to change your boot order so that the CD-ROM is the first device. You may be getting the insert disk error because the computer is booting to the floppy drive instead of the CD-ROM.
 
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i ran into similar problems my first time installing XP pro. i found that formatting using the Win ME disk i had caused me all manner of problems.

i tossed away the ME disk and just used XP. once i had activated CDR as my primary boot device, the format using the XP cd went very smoothly with no problems.

so, you may wanna forget using your 98 boot disk to format.

V***V
 
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