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Intel Turbo Boost Technology

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Tabvla, May 14, 2014.

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  1. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    I understand what Intel Turbo Boost technology is and how it works.

    What I would really like to know is "....does it do what it says on the can...." In practice does this technology really work seamlessly in the background as your computing demands vary depending on your current needs?

    I am currently considering the purchase of a computer with an Intel® Core™ i5-4200U Processor that is rated 1.6 GHz and 2.6 GHz with TurboBoost, incorporating a 3 MB cache. Some of the work that I do is as mundane and low-usage as Word or Excel and a 1.6 GHz processor is more than adequate. But much of the work that I do is graphically intensive and I expect that at 1.6 GHz the processor will fall over but at 2.6 GHz it should be just fine.

    In the real-world of hands-on use is this Intel Turbo Boost technology the answer to vastly different workloads such as that described above... :confused:

    TiA

    T.
     
  2. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    IMO you would be much better off spending the extra money to get like a 3570 or 4670 with 6meg of cache. If you are going to be doing cpu intensive tasks, I doubt you would be happy with the cpu you have selected. If whatever program you are using specifies say a 2.0gig cpu, do not buy a 1.6 and expect the turbo boost to compensate for an underpowered cpu.

    To answer your question, the turbo boost works fine with no problems.
     
  3. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    CRJ.... thanks for your feedback.

    Using your advice as a guideline, my research indicates that for an extra US$250 (about £150 in London) I can purchase the following specs.....

    Processor : Intel® Core™ i7-4500U Processor (1.8 GHz, 3.0 GHz with TurboBoost, 4 MB cache)
    RAM : 8GB DDR3
    Graphics : NVIDIA GeForce GT745M with 2GB memory

    Would you consider this to be a good compromise ?

    T.

    NOTE

    When considering costs it is relevant to note that in the UK (and in Europe in general) we pay approximately 1.5 times what you fortunate folk pay in the US. In the US a piece of kit that costs US$100 - exactly the same specification piece of kit will cost in GBP or EUR the equivalent of US$160. And this applies to both hardware and software. So in general terms cost is usually more of a deciding factor in Europe than it is in the US.
     
  4. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    Boost only works in short bursts and it works in levels on some of the cores, you won't have all the cores running at 3Ghz for extended periods. The more cores that are in use the less of a boost you'll get, so if you have have heavy use on a single core that it may take that single core up to 3Ghz. If you have heavy use on two cores it may go somewhere in between 1.8Ghz an 3Ghz for those two.

    If you are looking for performance you shouldn't be looking at "U" models, those are ultra low power models.
     
  5. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    Rob, thanks for the very useful information (y)

    What do the Intel designations mean in terms of power? If Intel "U" models are low-power, what Intel designation indicates high-power? And in this context does the term "power" mean the same thing as "performance" or does "power" have another meaning?

    Of what relevance (in terms of performance) are the combination of "i" numbers and Alpha-designations? For the uninformed (which includes myself) the impression is that "i7" is more powerful than "i5" which in turn is more powerful than "i3". But based on you reply it would appear that the "i" number is only part of the code with respect to CPU performance.

    T.
     
  6. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    Power as power consumption.

    Here's a list of current Haswell processors with what the letters mean at the end: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haswell_(microarchitecture)

    As for i3 vs i5 vs i7, little more complicated. The higher the number the better the feature set and maybe higher overall performance...in some situations. You also have 4 generations of i series processors now, the original 3 digit ones, the 2xxx, 3xxx, and the current 4xxx series and since performance has increase you could have an 4th gen i5 outperform a second gen i7. But there's tons on reviews and benchmarks on the internet to explain and show that.
     
  7. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    Hi Rob, thanks for the link to Wiki. (y)

    Are Haswell and ARK the same thing by a different name?

    T.
     
  8. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    Umm no. Haswell is type of processor microarchitecture and ARK, Automated Relational Knowledgebase, is Intel's information resource.
     
  9. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    I thought not !! It is just the way Intel have designed their Webpage.... which reads.... ARK (formerly Haswell) How is that for confusing :eek:

    You state that the term "power" relates to "power consumption" and not "performance". I am confused by your statement
    If "U" models are no good for performance then what combination of "i" designator and "alpha" model would constitute a good performance spec?

    T.
     
  10. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    How so? You generally don't get high performance and low power consumption, it's usually one or the either although many newer ones are striving for a good balance.

    It looks like I lost a character on the link I posted above. This is the article I meant to link to directly: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haswell_(microarchitecture)#Mobile_processors

    So based of the chart there you would want a processor with a M and/or Q suffix or a combination with those, preferably one in the performance section and one with a fast clock speed.
     
  11. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    Rob, thanks for clarifying the Intel processor suffix for the system I need and the new link to the Wiki website.

    This information greatly improves my search for the system that I need. (y)

    When I think that I have found the appropriate system I will post the specs in this Thread and perhaps you may like to comment.

    Thanks again....

    T.
     
  12. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    Rob and CRJ - the following looks like quite a good spec..... yes? no?

    Processor : Intel® Core™ i7-4700HQ Processor (2.4 GHz, 3.4 GHz with TurboBoost, 4 MB cache)
    RAM : 8GB DDR3
    Graphics : NVIDIA GeForce GT750M

    T.
     
  13. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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  14. Tabvla

    Tabvla Thread Starter

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    CRJ, thanks for your reply. Yes it is a laptop.

    If I was purchasing a PC there would be little need for me to do this research as I am much more confident of my knowledge in the realm of PC's. But my goal is to liberate myself from my desk.

    Up until now my laptops have been low-spec models primarily used for email and Internet access. I am now considering the purchase of a high-spec laptop that will enable me to do most of my graphics work away from my desk - and graphics is about 50% of what I do.

    Selecting the right spec is important, not only because it is a big chunk of cash, but perhaps more importantly because a considerable amount of work will go into setting up the machine with the software tools, and customising those tools, for the graphics work that I do.

    I need to make sure that I understand what I am buying before I commit.

    T.
     
  15. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Yes, that one is fine.
     
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