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Internet Speed upload and download differential

Discussion in 'Networking' started by ngk0585, Nov 2, 2019.

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  1. ngk0585

    ngk0585 Thread Starter

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    I check speed with Ookla. I get Ping = 11 ms (which I think is slow) Download=240.05Mbps and upload =11.77Mbps

    I downloaded a vid file of 11.190Mb and it took 4:54. Hmm on a 240Mbps it should have loaded almost instantly. Telling me that the provider upload is only 0.038 MBps upload. Accounting for the traffic it indicates a similar differential for Cloud vendors. This is fine if you are at home downloading movies and can go get coffee meanwhile.

    At work we have been sold on cloud computing. What a rip! with a differential factor of 20 the fastest we can work on the cloud is 11.77Mbps, assuming the app functions up to par. Cloud is basically the old 1980's client server methodology. If I can't upload faster (competing with the other computers in the office as well) we are much better off having the business application on a local server.
    I have called Spectrum, Comcast and AT&T and the people you talk to do not have that question on their pat answer sheets and are no knowledgeable enough to discuss it. Our Business software provider (cloud) does not have a clue either. Comcast offer me a 980Mbps down and 30Mbps upload but the is the same problem.
    Question 1) How do Cloud servers provide the 240Mbps I use to download, or is that a scam to offset slow internet?
    2)Is there any way around the throttling we experience?
    3) Should we simply shell out the $$$ for new local server and buy the expensive software, and is this simply a way to sell us on $$$ ?
    Any ideas?
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Certainly for residential service all ISPs allocate 90% or so of the bandwidth to the down stream, because that is where customers need it. I am quite surprised that none of Comcast, Spectrum and AT&T can offer you business service with the up stream bandwidth you need. Are you sure that the representatives you are talking to know that you are talking about service for a business and that you are asking the right questions?
     
  3. SpywareDr

    SpywareDr

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    Here at home we use Verizon FIOS (optical fiber), their 100/100 Mbps internet (only) option. And this is what we're getting right now:

    [​IMG]

    for $39.99/month.
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Is that (same down/up) typical for fiber, SpywareDr? I know it is not typical for cable or DSL.
     
  5. SpywareDr

    SpywareDr

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    Yep, Verizon's FIOS is a 100% fiber-optic network. The little optical cable (no wires) that comes into our house is smaller than a Bic pen ink tube ... and that's including the insulation. The 0/1 bits are being transferred back and forth via light instead of an electrical current current through wires. Slicker than snot on a doorknob. ;)
     
  6. SpywareDr

    SpywareDr

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  7. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    First. There is a difference between MB and Mb. The B being capitalized versus the b being lower case makes a big difference in the overall size of the data you're talking about. MB>Mb.

    Second, cloud works for many businesses but an assessment should have been made before making the huge jump into being cloud only. As you've discovered your network traffic requirements (which there are no specifics in this thread) has caused performance problems. A couple of applications which lend themselves to working in the cloud are web servers and pure data processing where all the I/O transactions are in the cloud environment and what you pull out are the end results. Also cloud serves well for long term archiving of data or as a COOP/DR site.

    There are other methods to help accelerate the experience which would involve using WAN acceleration techniques that would place a virtual WAN accelerator appliance at the cloud location and you would run a physical one at your office.

    If you're trying to do a single large one time data load into your cloud environment, some cloud services provide an ability for you to do a large massive data dump onto an external device they ship to you and then you ship back for the cloud provider to upload locally on their end. AWS' version of this is called Snowball. This saves you from dealing with bandwidth issues trying to upload massive amounts of data and you'll only have to deal with the differentials/deltas/incrementals afterwards.

    I'm not sure how large of a business we're dealing with here. But based on the ISP services you've identified, you're a small shop looking for small/economy pipes. Large corporations utilize larger Internet pipes which are OC3, OC48, OC192, and MetroE.

    Finally, many businesses adopt a hybrid model where part of their applications are being hosted on prem while those that can be pushed up to the cloud will be.

    Cloud can work for many use cases. But you have to do your homework first. Why cloud has been discussed so much is the ability for an organization to push the infrastructure costs to a third party. You're not having to deal with having staff on hand with expertise to manage a large variety of IT equipment, you're not dealing with the CAPEX/OPEX cost of running your own equipment, you're not dealing with physical space issues, and cloud allows one to easily provide access to applications for all members of your work force (whether they be in the actual office or remote).

    Office365 is an example of a cloud service which has been pretty successful.
     
  8. ngk0585

    ngk0585 Thread Starter

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    Great information! Thanks. I'll study more. BTW, I was accosted at Costco Saturday by AT&T guy selling Costco sponsored internet and told me that their fiber can give me 300Mb down and 300Mb up both. I did not know that could be offered. AT&T business did not offer that. We are a small shop of 15 people working on the cloud application. I am the only one with computer experience. Time is of the essence always. Overall the caveat was/and is that we do not have AT&T fiber available at or around our office. So we are still stuck.
    I am talking to our Cloud App vendor about this issue and they haven't responded with good info yet.

    No, you are right. It is "exxxtreeemly" difficult to talk to someone other that a sales person with a script who really knows nothing. It is a tough barrier to break.

    Still searching. Great information to work with to talk to our vendors.
    Thanks
     
  9. SpywareDr

    SpywareDr

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