Is 5400RPM better than 7200RPM? (Regarding the lifespan)

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senshi

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Ok, my friend tells me that 7200RPM, although faster, is not a wise decision.

He says that since it is spinning so fast, it is more likely to malfunction in the future and has a much shorter lifespan than the 5400RPM.

Is this true?

From my experience, all I can say is that my 3 hard drives which were 7200RPM have all failed me after a year or two of use. I ended up with clicking noises at first, and then they slowly died.

However, I have had a 5400RPM drive for about 3 or 4 years now and its still working beautifully?

Can anyone clarify this for me?
 
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When 7200rpm disks came out first yes they were a bit dodgy but in the last year they have come up to spec. In short - if you a buy a new 7200 rpm disk today its better than any 5200 rpm disk
 

crjdriver

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Not really.

All drive mfg have cut costs. Drives used to last quite a few years; now it is common to have a failing drive after 1-2 years. Note some drives do last a long time. It is just not uncommon to have one fail after a year or two.

BTW after having several WD drives fail in the last two years, I now install and use Maxtor drives.
 
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I work as a tech in a computer shop and I've seen all brands of disk die, be they Maxtor, Seagate, IBM, Samsung, WD, Toshiba or Fujitsu (especially Fujitsu, actually). IBM had a very bad run with their 7200rpm Deskstar drives a while back, but every manufacturer has released lemons. You cannot generalise about the quality of a brand of drive from the few you have owned, if you must make generalisations at least base them on statistically significant data. www.storagereview.com has a drive reliability database you can study.
 

senshi

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Arcadion, I'm interested in your opinion on this matter.

Do you beleive that a 5400RPM will last longer or is more reliable than a 7200RPM drive?

Doesn't it make sense that since the drive is spinning so fast there is a greater chance of a bearing or screw getting loose causeing the drive to malfunction?
 
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I've been very happy with Seagate and WD, my Seagate (see sig) I've had for 7 years and it still runs like a champ with just XP and a few progs on it, quiet as a mouse too. My WD I've also had for a number of years I've had no trouble with either of them. I am not as happy with Maxtor as I've had a few of them die. In the next year or two I plan to retire my Seagate to the shelf of spare parts and get a big new drive *shiny* :D . I highly reccomend WD and Seagate :D
 
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senshi said:
Arcadion, I'm interested in your opinion on this matter.

Do you beleive that a 5400RPM will last longer or is more reliable than a 7200RPM drive?

Doesn't it make sense that since the drive is spinning so fast there is a greater chance of a bearing or screw getting loose causeing the drive to malfunction?
I have never seen a hard disk fail because of a bearing or screw coming loose. Bad sectors, crashed heads or a fried circuitboard, yes. 7200rpm drives are not simply 5400rpm drives that have been made to spin faster than they should. If anything, the extra stress acting on the moving parts in a 7200rpm drive will mean that they are designed to handle greater strain than 5400rpm drives. In my opinion, the reliability of hard disks is independent of the speed they spin at, unless your case is so poorly-ventilated that the drive overheats (this is rarely an issue with modern desktop drives). The data density of the platters and design flaws in the circuitry are more likely to cause drive failure, and these are independent of the RPM.
 

JohnWill

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Oct 19, 2002
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106,429
Actually, I've seen a number of hard disk bearings go, but nowadays they usually die of some other aliment first. I buy 7200 or 10k drives because they're faster! :D
 
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