1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Is putting together a computer really that hard?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by kashmir09, Aug 2, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. kashmir09

    kashmir09 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2004
    Messages:
    308
  2. qldit

    qldit

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,390
    Good Morning kashmir09, the problem with learning is that the best experiences are made by suffering mistakes.

    As a basic intro anyone wishing to learn would be better served by getting an older machine such as a P3 or something 5 years or so old, and stripping it down completely to all it's basic components and then re-assenbling and getting it working and then cleaning and reinstalling the operating system and drivers etc. (completely)
    Ensuring that every aspect of every component and it's operation is understood.

    This includes antistatic knowledge and how to handle various components.

    The complexities and delicateness of the newer systems then needs to be learned on top of this basic knowledge.
    This process needs to be "hands on" all the way.

    Others will have different ideas.
    Cheers, qldit.
     
  3. wacor

    wacor Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Messages:
    27,340
    Cheers Gildit

    Once again you come up with some outstanding advice.

    So simple yet such a great idea. you pick up an old computer for next to nothing and then strip it down and mess around with it.

    My simple mind never gave that much of a thought. But I think I will do that. and as more advice and questions and comments arise on this thread I will come back and view.

    hope all is well in Australia.
     
  4. Old Bob

    Old Bob

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    Messages:
    491
    kashmir,

    A "high performace gaming machine" sounds like using expensive parts !!!

    This may not be the best place to start - as qldit suggests "start slow".
     
  5. qldit

    qldit

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2005
    Messages:
    3,390
    To really appreciate learning, and this "seeing what makes it tick" method, the greatest practical example I ever saw was a young enginnering friend living out in the countryside.
    When I visited, I asked what was all the stuff out in the top paddock, all bits of machinery scattered around.
    The answer..."It was a learning exercise to see how a D9 functioned"!!
    This chap later became a major mechanical trouble-shooting engineer and representative for a major machinery company.

    I find it is very easy teaching people how to fix machines using the same principle.
    And it is certainly inexpensive.

    Thanks wacorsaut but it was not my idea, I have several machines I use purely for this exercise, along with dismantled hard drives, CDROMS, and that kind of thing.

    A good exercise is to obtain a suitable old hard drive that will function, and observe exactly how it operates under normal operation with a real system on it with it's cover off.
    These are the kinds of things that are not only practical but incredibly interesting and not many people have actually done it.
    From the way the drive operates as the machine boots, through to the heads parking when de-powered. Even observing operation with a partitioned drive.

    At the end of a reasonable session most beginners can reason as to how problems may be solved, and learn the varied technical commonsense neccessary to work with more complex machines.

    It is strange to suddenly find some inconspicuous person suddenly discussing and talking a language that no-one else understands.
    Suddenly terms like "linear read speed" have meaning.

    From my point of view it is incredibly interesting and satisfying.

    As a suitable reference point the machine for the exercise needs to be relatively modern so that sme degree of similarity with present machines is obvious.

    Cheers qldit.
     
  6. seekermeister

    seekermeister

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,140
    Then, you might do as I did the first time. The company that I bought my components from specialized in teaching their customers how to build the machine. I have always found that building the machine is the easy part. The hard part is getting the OS, drivers and software to all perform as they should.
     
  7. Old Bob

    Old Bob

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    Messages:
    491
    Think the point everybody is making is:

    It's better to learn [and possibly "burn-out" a $15 part] rather then a $200 "cutting-edge" part !!!
     
  8. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/488926

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice