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Is there a way to clean my computer?

Discussion in 'All Other Software' started by BrianJones, Feb 2, 2013.

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  1. BrianJones

    BrianJones Thread Starter

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    I have a new Dell that I will be using for my small buisness. I know some companies, such as Dell, will put on some trial versions and other software programs that are not needed. Since this computer is new, I would really enjoy cleaning all this stuff out and uninstalling all of it, but I dont know enough about computers to know which I can delete and which I must keep.
    I also would like to remove all anti virus software and instal my own -- is this something that anyone can please help with? and if so, can you please tell me what the first step must be so that I can get you all the needed information or scans please? thank you in advance!!!
     
  2. raybro

    raybro

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    I have not personally used it, but Decrapifier has been recommended by a few of the more advanced members on TSG.

    Since I've not used the program, I suggest you give it some time and see if another member who has used it has something to contribute.
     
  3. SUEOHIO

    SUEOHIO

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    When i buy a computer brand new i usually go to the add/remove and see whats in there that i know i wont use or need. you just have to take a look and see if its something you know you will need or are familiar with or used in the past.a good antivirus is ms security essentials. i have it in all of my computers and ive never had problems with it and its a free program to download.if it looks like a trial version and you know you dont want it or need it then you can remove it if you choose to.maybe just use the computer for awhile to get used to it and then you can make a better decision as to what you want to keep or not.
     
  4. md2lgyk

    md2lgyk

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    I've used Decrapifier on several machines. It identifies all the junk programs; you choose which to delete.
     
  5. BrianJones

    BrianJones Thread Starter

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    To better understand, is this a program I download or a website? and this will tell me all the files that i can delete without causing problems to my OS or any other functions of the computer?
    From there, i can delete all or as many of the programs that Decrapifier suggests without worry?
     
  6. Frank4d

    Frank4d Retired Trusted Advisor

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    Almost. It will tell you the files it thinks you should delete; but it is up to you to decide if you don't want to delete something, uncheck it in the list that Decrapifier displays. If you're not sure you can run the program up to where is suggests what should be deleted, then stop and post a screenshot for us to advise on. The program can be downloaded here: http://pcdecrapifier.com/download

    For example, here is what Decrapifier suggests I should delete:
     

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  7. AtlBo

    AtlBo

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    Hello Brian: The above suggestions are good ones, especially take your time and get used to what is there before you remove anything. It can be some trouble to find and replace manufacturer's support software if you remove it, for example. In some cases, the support software may come bundled in a download with the things you'd rather not have and you have to start all over getting rid of things.

    One other thing. With some time, you will learn how to move things out of the way that you don't use much. Feel free to ask if you have any questions about this topic.

    I'm not all that experienced either, but I bought an HP with 2 hard drives a couple of years ago. It had a restore (backup) partition on the second drive that was set up to duplicate of my main hard drive. I just wanted back ups of my files, and it took everything in me to get rid of the backup partition, but I finally pushed the button. It was really tough because all the features were built into the support software. I was a little worried I'd lose the functionality of the support software, which I wanted to keep. It all worked out fine for me, and I'm sure it will for you too.

    Sounds to me like you are more or less where I was when I bought this computer...

    Just a tip...if you have one hard drive and not more, don't get rid of your recovery partition. Even then you must back up your files (pictures, videos, music, spreadsheets, word documents, scanned documents, pdfs, and all the like). Backing up Documents and Settings is my approach in Windows XP...
     
  8. BrianJones

    BrianJones Thread Starter

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    On another forum topic I was told to post Hijackthis & DDS

    If I were to do that here (the other forum topic was closed), is there anyone here who could read that information and help by telling me what I should and shouldn't delete please?
     
  9. raybro

    raybro

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    Don't have a clue about DDS, but HiJackThis is a well known program on TSG. There are, however, only a few members authorized to analysis and advise on the log file resulting from a HJT scan. So you can certainly post a HJT scan log file and wait for one of the authorized members to get to it.

    Having said that, a HJT scan is generally done for the purpose of getting to the root of a problem the poster is having with the computer. My understanding of your situation is more one of what can you uninstall safely. HJT will, in fact, provide some info about what is on your computer, but that is not the primary purpose of a HJT scan.

    Another feature of HJT may be more applicable to your goal. In the HJT Main Menu, there is a box labeled "Open the Misc Tools Section". Click that and in the next window, under System Tools, there is another labeled "Open Uninstall Manager". When you click that, you will get a list of everything installed on your computer. Click the "Save List" button and it will be saved in Notepad. Copy the list and paste it into a reply to this thread.

    That may be the more valuable bit of information to aid in helping you.
     
  10. AtlBo

    AtlBo

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    BrianJones...why don't you start with the Anti-Virus.

    It would be a good idea to have it first anyway.

    Which anti-virus is pre-installed on the machine? Many of the anti-virus companies have uninstaller software you can use to get rid of their anti-virus program. They can be difficult to remove...

    Also, I recommend downloading and installing a good program uninstaller...Comodo Programs Manager is freeware and is what I use. It's the most straightforward and fool proof for me, and the interface looks like the add/remove area in XP. You'd be wise to have one of these on board monitoring installations for you from the beginning. Definitely whichever one you choose, it will help to keep your computer spic and span by removing needless files and registry entries when you get rid of a program.

    The next topic would be a good cleaner software. CCleaner seems to be the most popular one, and it's what I have. You may want to give it a try. It's freeware, too. Whatever you choose, don't run it without going over the settings with someone with some experience with the program. It's fine for use, but the default settings for CCleaner are a little like nuking Maine to kill some Canadians...

    After you get this stuff done or are satisfied to move on, then we could get down to what's on the machine that shouldn't be there, etc. I think it would be best this way, unless someone has a better approach...
     
  11. 1002richards

    1002richards Retired Trusted Advisor

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  12. BrianJones

    BrianJones Thread Starter

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    I had two similar questions posted and they felt this was the place the question should be listed so they closed the other one. And yes, that is where they talked about highjack and DDS. But before going through with it all, I wanted to make sure someone would be able to read it if I posted it here.
     
  13. BrianJones

    BrianJones Thread Starter

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    Can you help me find out this information? Where can I look to find this information? I did ask them not to include the anti-virus trial version (I forget which company), but I'm sure they have some sort of software on there as the default anti-virus program --- but if someone can please help me find out which software I have, that would be a great help!




    is Comodo (or others) better at uninstalling than Add/Drop in Control Panel?
    My laptop is still in the box - do I need to run CCleaner now? or is that something to install and use to keep my system clean in the future? and Comodo (or something similiar) is best to instal now before I start uninstalling programs, is that what you're suggesting?

    Thank you for your help!
     
  14. raybro

    raybro

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    Hello again Brian... In all candor, reading through this thread again leads me to believe your level of knowledge of computers is somewhat limited. Based on this, I strongly suggest to you that before you do anything with this computer, you get a backup program and another hard drive on which to store a backup image of the original configuration. I'm assuming this is a laptop machine, so an external enclosure with a hard drive inside and connected via USB is the usual configuration for a backup system. The HDD needs be fairly large because a full backup image of your internal drive will be a large file and if you use it correctly, you will be creating subsequent incremental images to keep the backup updated. But we can get into all that if you decide to go this route. If you need guidance on hardware, we can provide some recommendations.

    Having a backup of your computer is good practice regardless of a users level of knowledge, but is especially important for a novice. There are a number of free backup programs available for download. I'm partial to Easeus ToDo Backup Home 5.6. We around TSG are also quite fond of Acronis True Image 2013. The program costs about $30 depending on where you purchase it (Amazon has it for $28.54 + Tax and shipping). I actually use both programs as each has its own particular features which I like.

    The very first thing you want to do after installing, is create a bootable rescue media. This can be a flash drive or a CD/DVD. After that, you will create a full backup image of your internal drive to the external drive. It's a pretty simple process once you understand it and TSG will be here to help you through it if needed.

    If something goes really haywire in doing what you want to do, its a simple matter to boot your computer with the flash drive and restore the internal drive to the same configuration it was in when you created the backup or that of an incremental image you may or may not want to create during the process. You can choose either and do this repetitively until you get it right. Belt and suspenders. :D

    I know this sounds like a lot to absorb, but if you want to learn how to do this process TSG is one of the best forums on which to do so. Almost every member on this forum was once a novice and has been helped (and continues to be helped) by other members. That's really what TSG is all about.
     
  15. AtlBo

    AtlBo

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    BrianJones.

    Since your PC is still in the box, I think it's best for you to check the box to see if you can see which Windows you have on the machine before you get started. If you can't find a reference on the box, then when you open the box and start the PC, check first to see what version of Windows it is running. Let us know.

    Yes, you would need to download and install the programs I mentioned.

    I use Windows XP, so I if you have Windows 7 on your new machine, I can't speak for its native performance features, but Comodo Programs Manager is far better than the native add/remove in XP. It keeps a log of installed files, folders, and registry entries and removes them all. Maybe someone with some knowledge of Windows 7 will come along to help with some information of how well add/remove works in Windows 7. I have a query out on the subject right now on a info board. CCleaner is a program you'll want to download even if you have Windows 7 on your machine. Just don't run it until you are able to hear from some experienced users of the program.

    raybro is right on all counts about acquiring a back up drive and backing up your system. This is the absolute most important step to setting up a new PC. This is compounded exponentially in importance since you will be using the computer for your business. Not sure why the manufacturers don't include and extra hard drive honestly...even with laptops.
     
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