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Is there a way to identify read-only files in a word folder?

Discussion in 'Business Applications' started by sofianna, Jan 27, 2005.

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  1. sofianna

    sofianna Thread Starter

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    Hello all

    I have just subscribed and really hope you can help. I am slightly pc literate (well for a non IT person anyway) but this one has me stumped.

    We regularly need to run a batch conversion process in Word 2003 using the conversion wizard function which converts word files to rtf and text so they can then be converted onto our database/contact management system (we run a small IT recuitment business and this is how we get a big folder containing 1000s of resumes onto the system in one go).

    The problem is that occasionally candidates save the CV in read only and every time the batch conversion wizard hits a read-only file it stalls. So we have to go into the folder, remove that file and start the whole process again. This can take hours if several of these files crop up and we have to keep re-starting the batch conversion over and over...

    So my question is, Is there any way, when looking at a folder in word that you can search for/ identify all the read-only files in that folder without having to go into every one individually? If we could do this, we could find them all at the beginning of the process, remove them and run the process in one go without interruption.

    Hope this makes sense?! If any of you out there have any bright ideas I would really appreciate it!

    I have already tried going into 'view' and arranging files by attribute but I couldn't see an option for read only... help!
     
  2. kiwiguy

    kiwiguy

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  3. ddockstader

    ddockstader

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    It can't be easily done in Word, but you can do it in Windows Explorer. Since you're running Word 2003, I'm betting you are running some form of Windows XP. The instructions are similar for earlier operating systems, but this should suffice. First, open up Windows Explorer: Start > Programs > Accessories > Windows Explorer. Select the subdirectory in which you store your CVs. Select View > Details. Then select View > Choose Details. The sixth item down is Attributes. Check that and click OK. You will now see another column at the right of all the details. Most of the files are marked A, which means they haven't been archived. But if you see a file marked R, that's the culprit. Open it and resave it, removing the read-only property. That should take care of it.
     
  4. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    Rather than worrying about which files are read only, why not just first run a simple batch file to remove that file attribute from all the files in the directory and any subdirectories.

    For example, if all the files are in something like a C:\data directory (and even in subdirectories), you could first run a batch file:

    attrib c:\data\*.* -r /s
     
  5. sofianna

    sofianna Thread Starter

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    Many thanks for the quick response - that looks a bit scary to a novice like me but I will give it a go!

     
  6. sofianna

    sofianna Thread Starter

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    Thanks Bob, I can't believe how quickly everyone got back to me! Loks a bit scary but I will give it a try

     
  7. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    sofianna,

    As long as the data is in the same directory, or subdirectories, this should work quite well. It's just a simple one-liner. Good reason to keep DOS based commands around. Much harder to do and automate with something like the Windows Explorer.

    Also a good reason to keep your data files as organized as possible.

    kiwiguy - wound up posting shortly after yours. Basically they say the same thing. I just like to post the information directly when possible rather than supplying links, especially when it is so short.
     
  8. sofianna

    sofianna Thread Starter

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    You are a superstar, many thanks for the quick reply! I am a total beginner so the step by step instructions are much appreciated!


     
  9. Bob Cerelli

    Bob Cerelli

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    sofianna,

    Since both methods will work, you might want to look at your requirements and how much manual work vs. automated you want to do regularly.
     
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