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It says it worked but it didn't...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by rubn69d, Oct 31, 2005.

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  1. rubn69d

    rubn69d Thread Starter

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    Suddenly I can't copy pictures from "My Pictures" to a cd. I have Windows XP Home edition and I have copied pictures before but now although it goes through all the motions and says I have successfully copied the pictures to cd; when I reinsert the cd it is treated as a blank cd or not recognized as having a cd inserted at all. Please help!!!!
     
  2. slipe

    slipe

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    Take a look at some of the CDs you recorded and compare them with the ones that won’t read. At the right angle of reflection you can see where the surface has a slightly different reflectivity where it was recorded. If you completely filled the CD it is hard to tell, but CDs record from the inside out and you can usually see the cutoff between recorded and unused surface.

    Once you learn to recognize that you can tell whether anything was recorded on the CDs that won’t read. There is usually pretty good feedback between the writing software and burner, so it is unusual for the recording to appear to progress normally and have nothing recorded.

    Try using some different recording software. There is freeware on the internet and trial versions of programs like Nero. The XP built-in recording software was having problems recording to my CD writer, but it works fine with Nero. My problem wasn’t similar to yours though – the XP software just kept asking for a blank CD with several brands of CDs I knew were good.

    If the recording process seems to appear normal with both the XP recording software and a trial version of Nero but you confirm visually that nothing is being recorded on the CD, then I would guess your CD writer might be bad.

    Give us more details. Are you formatting the CD? CDR or RW? Is the software recognizing the CD as blank and available for recording although you have recorded to it? What software are you using to record and what steps are you using?
     
  3. hansmax

    hansmax

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    If you have another CD or DVD drive installed, try looking at them with that one. Happens to me all the time. Eventually the one I burned it on finally agrees to see it, too, usually.
     
  4. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    (edited)

    XP's implementation of CD writing is buggy, at best. ;`(

    It was apparent that XP uses packet writing (UDF), but this is not the case, according to
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpcd.php

    Packet writing is better, IMHO, than XP's "queue and burn later" method.
    Something like Nero InCD will probably work better. But, you will also have to erase
    and reformat any CD-RW discs, and throw away any CD-R discs, since CD-R can't be
    erased, and can't be formatted, once it's been written to. :(
     
  5. slipe

    slipe

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    Packet writing to RW is good for temporary backup until you can write a large block to CDR. The operative word is “backup”. Neither packet writing nor RW are appropriate for archive of data you have no other source for.

    Packet writing to RW has several disadvantages. The table of contents (TOC) is kept in the computer RAM until shutdown or removal of the CD to speed the process. If you have a crash or loss of power before the TOC has been written to the CD you will likely have problems accessing all of the data on the CD. There is recovery software made to retrieve the data without the TOC, so that is usually just a hassle.

    Anytime the formatted RW is in the computer the data is on an active drive. It can be accidentally erased or overwritten. It is vulnerable to file destroying viruses. I have read several posts by people who moved stuff to the CD and later realized it left the hard drive but never showed up on the CD.

    RW media isn’t considered as permanent as CDR. I have had a CD writer since 2X was the latest and greatest. I have yet to have a CDR go bad after it initially checked out. I have CDRs that are 10 years old that still read fine. I have some that have been in my car changer for 5 years in the Florida sun and still play. The very old ones are archived on cyanine based media because longer lasting dyes were not available. I should probably move anything I still want over to archive quality CDs. I don’t have long term experience with data on RW as I learned early that it wasn’t a safe place, but the so called experts say it isn’t an adequate long term archive media independent of disadvantages of packet writing.

    Roxio’s DirectCD will packet write to CDR. That is a safe place and method with some advantages over normal mastering software. It takes only 7Mb/session compared to 15 Mb/session for housekeeping for each session for mastering software. You can drag/drop or copy/paste to the drive and the data can not be corrupted after you close the session. I don’t like having packet writing software on the computer because it can’t be completely deactivated, but DirectCD to CDR is a good method for people who don’t mind having the software on their computer.

    The XP software is very good when it works. It automatically writes multisession so you can easily add new sessions and I like the simple interface. Since it won’t work lately with my computer and CD writer I would have to agree is isn’t as reliable as Nero, but when it works I find it works well.
     
  6. gyrgrls

    gyrgrls Banned

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    I have experienced pretty much the opposite, with regard to CD-R vs. CD-RW,
    but that's probably because I trusted crappy media when purchasing CD-Rs.

    However, the quality of the earlier CD-RW media, back when 2x was maximum,
    did leave much to be desired, and I wound up with my share of coasters.

    I don't fool around anymore, with optical media. I only go for the best
    Ridata (by Ricoh) or Tayo-Yuden discs. Cheap discs don't really save you
    any money at all, and besides, your data can be invaluable and irreplaceable.

    DVD+RW works fine for data backups, but I haven't tried UDF, let alone packet
    writing, on DVD+RW yet.
     
  7. slipe

    slipe

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    The shelf life of RW media is a secondary consideration to the vulnerabilities of the data if packet writing is used.

    RW has only 15% reflectivity compared to 60% for CDR and the phase change technology is more easily corrupted than the permanent bubbles made in CDR. In the old days the problem was often just getting the data on the CD with a low enough error rate to be readable. Without any research I was using CDRs with brand names I thought were good, but when I found a utility to read the data on the CD I found they were made by Ritek or CMC. Back then RW was initially more reliable than CDs not made by Taiyo Yuden or several other brands like Sony and Fuji that were made by TY or brands like TDK that made their own. TDK no longer makes their own and they aren’t very good.

    This is what Kodak has to say about the comparison:
    ” CD-R media is favored for the storage of data with long-term value. This is partly due to the life expectancy of the media. It is also due to the lower cost of the CD-R media versus CD-RW media. CD-R is also favored the storage of data you wish to share with other users because, at this time, it has broader playback compatibility than CD-RW media.”

    Ridata media is made by Ritek. Most of the off-brand CDs are made by either Ritek or CMC and they don’t have the best reputation. Ritek probably uses better quality control for the CDs they release under their own brand name like Ridata and Ritek Gold.

    Ridata uses Phthalocyanine dye, which is longer lasting than the basic Cyanine. But the lifetime of the CD is probably limited by the cheaper silver colored backing, which can deteriorate over time. The Mitsui Gold media is considered the best available for long term storage and quality, but they are pricey. The backing actually has a gold plating (probably a molecule thick) that doesn’t corrode.

    The recording gurus consider that the best readily available and reasonably priced media is Verbatim Data Life. They use a long lasting Azo dye and are all manufactured by the parent company, Mitsubishi Chemicals.

    Tayo Yuden holds the original patent for the basic Cyanine dye and as far as I know all of their CDs use Cyanine. It has only about a third of the rated life of Phthalocyanine or Azo, but TY CDs are very high quality. Starting with a lower error rate they will probably last as long as the Ridata and maybe even as long as Verbatim Data Life since neither have gold backings.
     
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