Japan Earthquake 2011

ekim68

Mike
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ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,703

At Fukushima plant, a million-tonne headache: radioactive water


In the grounds of the ravaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant sits a million-tonne headache for the plant's operators and Japan's government: tank after tank of water contaminated with radioactive elements.

What to do with the enormous amount of water, which grows by around 150 tonnes a day, is a thorny question, with controversy surrounding a long-standing proposal to discharge it into the sea, after extensive decontamination.
 

ekim68

Mike
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Fukushima to be reborn as $2.7bn wind and solar power hub


TOKYO -- Japan's northeastern prefecture of Fukushima, devastated during the 2011 earthquake and nuclear disaster, is looking to transform itself into a renewable energy hub, Nikkei has learned.

A plan is under way to develop 11 solar power plants and 10 wind power plants in the prefecture, on farmlands that cannot be cultivated anymore and mountainous areas from where population outflows continue.
 

ekim68

Mike
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Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima


Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life.

The camera study, published in the Journal of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, reports that over 267,000 wildlife photos recorded more than 20 species, including wild boar, Japanese hare, macaques, pheasant, fox and the raccoon dog—a relative of the fox—in various areas of the landscape.
 

valis

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Funny aside; I literally finished 'Wolves Eat Dogs' by Martin Cruz Smith last night. Its set in Chernobyl and the author touches on how the wildlife has thrived...
 

ekim68

Mike
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Japan reportedly decides to release treated Fukushima water into the sea


Japan will release more than a million tons of treated radioactive water from the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea in a decades-long operation, reports said Friday, despite strong opposition from environmentalists, local fishermen and farmers. The release of the water, which has been filtered to reduce radioactivity, is likely to start in 2022 at the earliest, said national dailies the Nikkei, the Yomiuri, and other local media.
 

valis

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that aint good....something something godzilla
 

ekim68

Mike
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Messages
57,703

Gov't to release Fukushima nuclear plant water into sea despite fishermen's objection


The Japanese government is poised to release treated radioactive water accumulated at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant into the sea despite opposition from fishermen, sources familiar with the matter said Friday.

It will hold a meeting of related ministers as early as Tuesday to formally decide on the plan, a major development following over seven years of discussions on how to discharge the water used to cool down melted fuel at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
57,703

Tagged snakes reveal radiation levels in the soil around Fukushima


As work continues to clean up the mess left by the meltdown of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, scientists are enlisting some local help in their efforts to survey the damage. A study has shown how snakes living in the Exclusion Zone can be serve as living, breathing monitors of radiation levels in the area, with the help of GPS and VHF tags.

The idea of using snakes to track radiation levels around Fukushima came from a group of researchers at the University of Georgia, who were drawn to a certain species for a few key reasons. The rat snake is an abundant species in Japan, typically traveling short distances and tends to accumulate high levels of radionuclides. This limited range of mobility, constant close contact with the soil and tendency to absorb radioactive material make them a useful "bioindicator" of residual contamination in the area.

 

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