Keep battery unattached when laptop is connected to outlet?

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Stephank

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No issues. Just curious. I have been using laptops for many years. I usually keep them on kitchen island, computer desk or whatever. I keep them plugged, and batteries are attached. Naturally, the batteries are close to %100 full. Very rarely do I use them on deck or picnic table in my back yard. The battery provides enough power for few hours. I read it here or some other web site that batteries should be taken off when using only power cord. Is this true or made up story?
Just like I said, I have never had problems. What is the best thing to do?
 

Gr3iz

Mark
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Since the battery on most newer model laptops require removing several screws and the back cover in order to disconnect, it would seem the system manufacturers seem to think it should remain connected all the time.
 

Couriant

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Maybe when the batteries were more detatchable but the battery technology has come a long way since. I don't think it's too much of an issue, just as long as you have good air flow
 

plodr

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I just learned that for longer life, batteries should not be charged above 80%!!! It's too late for me to change because all our devices: two netbooks, two tablets, two phones and a Kindle have been charged to 100% from day 1 when they came in the house.
You should also let it drop to 20%.

I didn't believe this when I first read it so I went on a mission to discover if it is true. It is. <sigh>
 

managed

Allan
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Liz, have you got any links to webpages that advise that 'not over 80%' idea ? Seems fishy to me.
 

Stephank

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Thanks tor all the input. I didn't know new laptops required screw removal to take the battery off. I shouldn't worry too much, then.
I think the debate regarding what percentage to charge a battery will never end. Especially, smart phones. Very confusing.
 

Couriant

James
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Thanks tor all the input. I didn't know new laptops required screw removal to take the battery off. I shouldn't worry too much, then.
I think the debate regarding what percentage to charge a battery will never end. Especially, smart phones. Very confusing.
Depending on the machine, you are looking to take off the back cover, then maybe a screw or two for the battery.

In all honesty it will depend on how the battery is made, and how you treat the laptop. I have machines that are fine and will lose its overall health within 3-5 years. Others they will expand on you within a year... like my user:

1620174918777.png

Does keep the laptop in a carrying bag... machine is not in sleep/off mode.... lol
 

managed

Allan
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Thanks Liz, I've read for and against this 20-80% idea. I'm not sure what to believe now !

I reckon it could be best to stick between 20% and 80% if possible though, but that would need a lot of discipline on the user's part.
 

Macboatmaster

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The number of charge cycles on the now generally in use batteries on laptops, mobile phones and tablets is, although the batteries are more efficient, generally more limited than on the older type of batteries.
This is especially so when the battery is allowed to run to more or less flat and then charged to 100%
Most if not all of the newer laptops, tablets and phones, especially some of the tablets that now come with a docking station, connected to the charger have the facility to limit the charge

Dells battery management app is a good example
Battery settings Dell Power Manager enables users to select a Battery Setting that is optimized for specific system usage patterns.
Dell Power Manager User's Guide
For example, some settings focus on extending battery life, while others provide fast charge times.

NOTE: Battery settings can be modified only if Dell batteries are attached to your system.
Available settings may be limited depending on the battery.
Possible battery settings include: ● Standard — Fully charges the battery at a moderate rate. This setting provides a balanced approach to extending battery life while providing a reasonably fast charging time. Recommended for users who frequently switch between battery and external power sources.
● ExpressCharge™ — Quickly charges the battery using Dell fast-charge technology. Recommended for users who need the battery to charge quickly. If the system is powered off, then the battery typically charges to 80 percent within one hour and 100 percent in two hours. The charge time may be longer if the system is powered on. NOTE: The ExpressCharge™ setting may cause battery health to diminish more quickly than other settings.
● Primarily AC — Extends battery life by lowering the charge threshold, so that the battery never charges to 100 percent capacity. Recommended for users who primarily operate the system while plugged into an external power source.


My new Acer M8 Smart Tab has such a docking station and when that is connected the battery is never charged above 60%.

Battery protection mode
Battery protection mode protects the battery from being overly charged. Being overly chargedexposes the battery to high temperatures and high voltage that may cause it to age faster. Whenthe tablets are plugged, the battery protection will keep the power level of the tablets between 40%and 60%.
Go to Settings > Battery > Battery Protection mode to turn on the battery protection mode.

The technical details are in basic explanation
Lithium-ion battery - Wikipedia
New data has shown that exposure to heat and the use of fast charging promote the degradation of Li-ion batteries more than age and actual use.[218] Charging Li-ion batteries beyond 80% can drastically accelerate battery degradation.[219][220][221][222][223]

The main reason for the change to Lithium-ion from NiCad and NiMah was because of the memory effect of the earlier batteries and the
far greater mAh capacity available in the smaller neater package
However the downside has been the increased susceptibility to degradation with low to full charge cycles.

So in summary do not leave it connected or use the battery management app or similar.
 

crjdriver

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I believe many electric car mfg recommend the 80% charge unless you are going on a long trip; then charge to 100%
I have been looking into getting an electric; even wired the garage for 240V 50amp circuit.
 
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Macboatmaster

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With the cost of a vehicle battery for a pure electric or even a hybrid
I believe many electric car mfg recommend the 80% charge unless you are going on a long trip; then charge to 100%
I am not surprised
The top of the Tesla range is approx £12K - FOR THE BATTERY
 
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