1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

LAN software

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by Body&Spirit, Jun 29, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    Hey Guys:

    I have a D850GB Intel board and have reinstalled Windows XP and am in the process of reinstalling the Intel drivers and files.

    According to Intel the order of installation of the Intel files & drivers is critical...so the numbers below denote the order of installation, the subscripted letters can be installed in any order in the numbered order.

    I have so far:

    1) upgraded my bios
    2) Reinstalled XP (with reformat) and SP2
    3) Installed the Intel Chipset Installation Utility (INF Utility) which enables the features built into the chipset.

    Now I must:
    4) Install all other Intel Drivers
    4a) LAN driver
    4b) IDE driver
    4c) Audio ADI driver
    5) Intel Application Accelerator

    I am presently stalled at the LAN driver installation. It is a complex installation and I am wondering if I really need it...

    1) I am not networked with any other computer in my home.
    2) My Internet Service Provider is Shaw Cable which provides high speed downloads etc.

    I have recently learned that Shaw Cable has me networked on a local area network with other homes in the area.:eek:

    That was a surprise! Shaw Cable is big in Canada and services many cities across it.

    I wouldn't be surprised if other cable companies operate the same way.

    Anyways, I don't know if the Intel software would be useful only for networked computers in my home or if it would also affect my local area network with other subscribers with Shaw Cable and thereby affect the speed of my connection with Shaw Cable.

    If it only affects my connection with other computers in my home, I am considering not reinstalling the software. If it affects my internet connection, I will have to undertake the laborious task of reading, interpreting and digesting the complex task of what each piece of software does and installing the applicable ones. All in the hope I will not make any mistakes.

    Does anybody have an answer to this?

    I have a:
    1) P4 1.3 Gh Intel D859GB motherboard
    2) 1.128 Gig memory
    3) XP Home Edition
     
  2. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    BUMP

    OK, maybe no one has "the" answer. :)

    But does anyone have any thoughts on this? :D
     
  3. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    24,388
    You have to have drivers for your network card if you want it to work. I have no idea what you mean by a "complex" installation. Since I don't live in Canada, I can't speak to their policies on broadband Internet connections, but I find it a bit shocking that they force you onto a network with your neighbors.

    Regardless, you have to install the drivers. If they make problems for your neighbors I would be incredibly surprised. However, without them, you won't have a connection at all.
     
  4. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    It is kinda strange.

    When I was reinstalling Windows XP (with reformat), there is a section at the end where it asks about the connection.
    a) a local area network
    b) direct connection to my ISP provider.

    I just automatically ticked (b), like I am "always" connected to my ISP and how could I not be "directly" connected to my ISP?:cool:

    The very next section asked two more complicated questions about the connection, to which I didn't have an answer.

    So, I called my ISP, Shaw Cable and asked for the answers to the complicated questions.

    I was ready to hang up, when just on impulse, I went to the previous screen with (a) and (b) and asked about them and was stunned when I was told to tick (a).

    I asked such questions like "Is this right?" and "How can that be?' etc. He was very clear that I was on a local area network with my neighbours.

    On a previous reinstall about 4 years ago, I had ticked (b) and I guess the computer just figured out what kind of connection I had.

    I am no expert in the high speed cable cable connection, but it does make some sense when one considers that similar material (TV programs) is being sent to each subscriber for their TV.

    I may be very wrong about this, but I don't think this is isolated to Canada. I think it is more than likely, cable companies in the US of A are, to use your phrase, "forcing" their subscribers to share the network as well.

    Someone who is reinstalling Windows, might wish to confirm this by calling their cable company and asking the question we normally wouldn't ask.:)

    I suspect the LAN with my ISP is somewhat different from the LAN that I may have with one or more computers in my home.
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    79,622
    First Name:
    Terry
    Partially the problem is that you are confused by Microsoft's confusing terminology. The ethernet adapter (card) has two main uses: connect to a Local Area Network (usually using a router, switch, hub or direct cable to another computer) or to a Wide Area Network (through a modem to a cable, DSL or satellite ISP). Microsoft usually calls either of these a LAN.

    So, while you are technically connected to a LAN (all the other subscribers on the same subnet) your bigger worry should be that you are connected to the entire internet.

    If you are using a firewall such as Windows XP SP2's with no exceptions or any of the 3rd party firewalls you are protected from those on the LAN and the internet.
     
  6. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    Yes, it is what I had thought, there are two different LAN's. :)

    And "always" being connected to the internet was a concern, so much so, that in addition to Norton's software firewall, I have a hardware firewall installed as well.

    In addition, I have a hardware switch to cut off my connection (cutting off the power) to the net when I do not expect to be using it for an extended period of time. So the continuous connection to the net is severed at my discretion.

    Maybe the above three methods are overkill, but the time to reconnect to the internet takes only seconds and I have the security of knowing that crackers will not find it easy to hack into my computer.:cool:

    People who want to do nefarious things usually want to do it quickly in order to escape detection and thereby avoid being responsible for their actions. Make it difficult enough and usually they will look for an easier victim.
     
  7. stevecook

    stevecook

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Messages:
    457
    You only need to install the 'LAN drivers' if you have a physical (RJ45 cable or ethernet) connection to your computer, if you don't it's not being used.
     
  8. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    Terrynet, thanks for clearing up the confusion of the two LAN's.

    Stevecook, thanks for your response. I think you may have answered my question. :)

    Putting it another way, if my computer is the sole computer in my home (i.e. and therefore not connected to another computer), then the LAN drivers are not being used?

    I don't have an ethernet connection to another computer. Nor do I assume [dangerous thing 'assuming' :)} that I have a RJ45 cable connection as I do not have another computer.
     
  9. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    24,388
    Your assumptions are not accurate. Broadband modems can connect to an Ethernet adapter also called a LAN card also called a network adapter all which connect to something using an RJ45 cable. Just because your computer isn't connected to another computer doesn't mean that you're not using an Ethernet connection. Look at how your modem is connected to your computer. If it's not USB, it's got to be Ethernet.
     
  10. The Hound

    The Hound

    Joined:
    May 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,235
    Try this...

    Install the Intel drivers (proset or whatever network adapter you have).
    Reboot.
    Plug in your ethernet cable (with its RJ45 connecters).
    Power up your cable modem.
    Run the Network Setup Wizard from control panel.
    When prompted, tick the "This computer connects through another computer or residential gateway".
    Finish out the wizard.
    Reboot.
    You may just be able to connect without installing all the 'features' that your Shaw Cable installation disc installs by default.:D
     
  11. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    DoubleHelix...

    My broadband connection to the internet has a jack to my card that looks like an oversized phone jack. Would this be the "so-called" RJ45 cable?


    The Hound...

    Actually I am connected to the internet. Ever since I installed XP some days ago.

    My confusion/concern goes back to my first post....

    In 2001, I bought my first PC computer which came with Me installed. Being used to Macs for 20 years (my first computer was the Apple II+ in 1981 when the personal computer was just a glint in IBM's figurative eye), I found Me unstable and when XP came out some months later, I immediately converted to it.

    I am given to understand that XP has more similarities to Windows 2000 than it has to Me.

    Anyways, I spent over a week crawling about Intel's website. The installs mentioned in my first post are Intel installs of their software and not third party installs which would come much later.

    Basically, they recommend the installation as promulgated in my first post in order to get the optimum performance out of my motherboard. For example, SP2 must be installed prior to the Intell software as SP2 changes some of the settings if the Intel software was installed first.

    I imagine that is the reason why Intel is also insistent on the order of installation of their software.

    Why am I doing this as most people usually just install XP and then their third party software & drivers?

    On shutdown, my computer will not physically shut down. It just hangs.

    If I install the Ghost image of my old XP installation, it shuts down fine.

    I put the question to this site, but wasn't able to get a response.

    I think it has something to do with the ACPI (Advanced Configuration and Power interface). For example, installing XP, Hibernation is not an elective on shutdown. Only Turn Off and Restart is available. Installing SP2, Hibernation is suddenly available. But the computer still hangs on shutdown.

    Even the older standard, APM (Advanced Power Management) is not available to me. If it was, I should be able to enable it through Start/Control Panel/Performance and Maintenace/Power Options/APM. But the APM tab is missing.

    My suspicion is that I need to upgrade my motherboard settings from Me to XP. The updated postings on the Intel site are of a date to include XP and usually mentions XP explicitly so they would be more current than the original software installed by the OEM manufacturer which had installed Me.

    I hope this brings some understanding about what this is all about.
     
  12. DoubleHelix

    DoubleHelix Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2004
    Messages:
    24,388
    Yes, an over-sized phone jack-looking cable is an RJ45 cable. You have a network adapter and are connected with an Ethernet connection.

    As for the rest of your post, I'm not clear on how many computers, or what computers, and what problems each of them has. You might want to start separate threads for each computer or problem.

    If the computer you originally posted about with regards to the network connection is now successfully connecting to the Internet without a problem, then that issue is solved.
     
  13. Body&Spirit

    Body&Spirit Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Messages:
    204
    So, to refocus everything.

    As per my first post, I have the most rudimentary of installations...

    3) to 5) above are Intel's driver/program installations.

    I have not installed any other third party drivers, software or programs. Programs like Word, etc...not installed. Software for my printer, scanner etc... not installed. Drivers for my mouse, keyboard etc...not installed.

    I am now stalled at 3a) above and it would take a technophile to readily understand the complex procedure of installing the "Intel LAN driver". Maybe with a solid week I would be able to understand it enough to have some assurance that it was installed correctly.

    So, the purpose of this thread and the objective of my first post was to ascertain if 3a) above was a critical installation and whether I could by-pass it.

    I realize the risks in bypassing it...
    1) If my current LAN is defective and I buy another computer and want to network it with this one, I run the risk of having to reinstall everything onto a clean system. It is a risk I don't mind taking as I would only instal basic stuff to make this computer into a mean machine and just use it for the internet.
    2) if it is a critical install, then I would have to reinstall everything as I am doing now, including 3a) above. What I don't know is whether or not it is a critical install. Everything "seems" to be working well except for:
    a) powering off as stated in my previous post.
    b) on shutdown, I get the occasional "Instruction at 0X********* referenced memory at 0X********. The memory could not be read. This may happen in once in thirty or forty shutdowns.

    I am absolutely no expert in any of this, but my sense is that the Intel LAN driver has nothing to do with the above issues. In fact, there is some evidence from Intel that the installation of 5) above may solve my power shut-down problem.

    So, am I creating problems for myself in not installing 3a) above? Or should I bite the bullet now and take the time to install the Intel LAN driver.

    I realize no one can give me a definitive answer on the question put just above. I am just asking for an informed opinion. Such an opinion would certainly be much better than my own.

    I would not be hanging such person from the nearest yardarm if the opinion turns out to be wrong or incorrect. :D It is my responsibility whether I embrace and act upon that opinion or not.:) To try to "blame" someone else would be to abdicate that responsibility.

    So, I would appreciate the opinion of anybody who knows something about this.
     
  14. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    79,622
    First Name:
    Terry
    You have an internet connection through your ethernet (LAN) adapter. So you have an OK driver installed. You have yet to mention any problem (at least, I couldn't find it), such as disconnects or slowness, etc. So if you are really not having a problem with it, move on!

    I have no idea what that "Intel Application Accelerator" is, but in general "accelerator" also goes by the term of "snake oil." Avoid them.
     
  15. The Hound

    The Hound

    Joined:
    May 27, 2007
    Messages:
    3,235
    If you have internet, LAN is good. If you have sound issues, install the audio chipset drivers--chances are XP found them for you.

    "The IntelĀ® Application Accelerator replaces the ATA drivers that come with Windows* with drivers optimized for desktop and mobile PCs using select IntelĀ® chipsets. It reduces the storage sub-system bottleneck, enabling the processor and other system level hardware to be more productive and efficient. It is not a requirement for your operating system to work properly."

    Perhaps not snake oil, but I wouldn't lose any more sleep over it. Install it if you wish.

    Check you BIOS version--if it's P17 or earlier, the BIOS upgrade (P18) is here....
     
  16. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/590021

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice