Solved Laptop showing exiting pxe rom check cable connection or no

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Abhiabhash

Abhi
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So today i was changing some setting in cmd after which my laptop fell from 3ft height it was working greatly after that i restarted my laptop afterwhich i see a messege pxe rom exiting check cable connection so i closed my ethernet or pxe lan but now its showing no bootable device found i have removed and reapllied my hdd but nothing happened what should have happened pls help
 
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When a computer cannot find something to boot an Operting System (such as Windows) from, it then tries to find one on a server using PXE. If that is also not available, the computer has no choice to throw up an error message about why it can't boot and then stop.

In the vast majority of cases, this error means that the hard drive has died and needs to be replaced.
 
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To add to what Doc has advised, check the BIOS to see if the boot sequence has somehow been changed and if the hard drive is detected/listed at all.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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Yup i checked my bios my hard disk has been detected and it is in 1st place in boot sequence it maybe a software corruption
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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Joined
Nov 11, 2018
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8
When a computer cannot find something to boot an Operting System (such as Windows) from, it then tries to find one on a server using PXE. If that is also not available, the computer has no choice to throw up an error message about why it can't boot and then stop.

In the vast majority of cases, this error means that the hard drive has died and needs to be replaced.
Bro my hdd is showin in the bios menu as well as in the boot menu
 
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Then the BIOS cannot find the boot partition on the HD so that it can hand off booting to the installed Operating System.

The boot partition is on Track 0. If the HD cannot find Track 0, because it is damaged somehow, the drive is no longer bootable ... nor will it ever be. It is damaged beyond repair and needs to be replaced.

If, when you dropped it, the heads hit the spinning platters, it would have caused permanent damage. Not only to the data that was there, but to the mirror-finish on the platters is now scratched/gouged. Those little bits and pieces that were scratched/gouged off are now flying.bouncing around inside the drive. Since the heads fly less than 1/20th the thickness of a human hair above the spinning platters, those bits and pieces cause even more damage, especially when they get stuck between the heads and platters.

Ontrack can find out how much damage might have been done.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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After droppodr my laptop i was able to use my laptop and it runs for more than 3-4 hrs then i restarted my system after which it was showing the problem and there is no crack sound coming from hdd

Most fun part is i shut down it and came after half hour and used it for almost 3 hr
 
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Yup i checked my bios my hard disk has been detected and it is in 1st place in boot sequence it maybe a software corruption
Can I ask how the HDD is identified in the BIOS, a Seagate HDD for example will be listed something like ST1000DM004 and a Western Digital along the lines of WD10JPLX other brands will have similar identification codes, only when such an ID code is present is a HDD actually detected and an entry simply listed as SATA HDD means that the BIOS will and has looked for a HDD in that particular boot sequence but no HDD was detected.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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Can I ask how the HDD is identified in the BIOS, a Seagate HDD for example will be listed something like ST1000DM004 and a Western Digital along the lines of WD10JPLX other brands will have similar identification codes, only when such an ID code is present is a HDD actually detected and an entry simply listed as SATA HDD means that the BIOS will and has looked for a HDD in that particular boot sequence but no HDD was detected.
Yup it is noted as WDXXXXXXXXX BLA BLA BLA IN BOOT MANAGER IT SHOWS MY HDD
 
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As the HDD is clearly identified there is a chance that you may be able to access the data on it and then back it up, we can post a guide for doing this but will need some additional info first.

Can you post the brand and model name or number of the notebook along with what version of Windows you are running, 7, 8.1 or 10 etc.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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I hav
As the HDD is clearly identified there is a chance that you may be able to access the data on it and then back it up, we can post a guide for doing this but will need some additional info first.

Can you post the brand and model name or number of the notebook along with what version of Windows you are running, 7, 8.1 or 10 etc.
I have lenovo Essential G SERIES LAPTOP (G500) WITH WIN 7
 
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I have lenovo Essential G SERIES LAPTOP (G500) WITH WIN 7
Did the computer ship with Windows 8 and was then downgraded to Windows 7, we need to know this as some models of the G500 series laptop have UEFI as opposed to Legacy BIOS and the instructions for booting from a USB device are different.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
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Did the computer ship with Windows 8 and was then downgraded to Windows 7, we need to know this as some models of the G500 series laptop have UEFI as opposed to Legacy BIOS and the instructions for booting from a USB device are different.
Yup bro it as delivered with win 8 and yes it has uefi/legacy bios
 
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Use Puppy Linux to see if you are able to recover your data "how to" below;

===================

***Required Hardware***

CD Burner (CDRW) Drive,

Blank CD,

Extra Storage Device (USB Flash Drive, External Hard Drive)


===================


1. Save these files to your Desktop/Burn Your Live CD:
2. Set your boot priority in the BIOS to CD-ROM first, Hard Drive Second

    • Start the computer/press the power button
    • Immediately start tapping the appropriate key to enter the BIOS, aka "Setup"

      (Usually shown during the "Dell" screen, or "Gateway" Screen)
    • Once in the BIOS, under Advanced BIOS Options change boot priority to:

      CD-ROM 1st, Hard Drive 2nd
    • Open your ROM drive and insert the disk
    • Press F10 to save and exit
    • Agree with "Y" to continue
    • Your computer will restart and boot from the Puppy Linux Live CD





3. Recover Your Data

  • Once Puppy Linux has loaded, it is actually running in your computer's Memory (RAM). You will see a fully functioning Graphical User Interface similar to what you normally call "your computer". Internet access may or may not be available depending on your machine, so it is recommended you print these instructions before beginning. Also, double clicking is not needed in Puppy. To expand, or open folders/icons, just click once. Puppy is very light on resources, so you will quickly notice it is much speedier than you are used to. This is normal. Ready? Let's get started.


    3a. Mount Drives
    • Click the Mount Icon located at the top left of your desktop.

    • A Window will open. By default, the "drive" tab will be forward/highlighted. Click on Mount for your hard drive.
    • Assuming you only have one hard drive and/or partition, there may be only one selection to mount.
    • USB Flash Drives usually automatically mount upon boot, but click the "usbdrv" tab and make sure it is mounted.
    • If using an external hard drive for the data recovery, do this under the "drive" tab. Mount it now.

    3b. Transfer Files.
    • At the bottom left of your desktop a list of all hard drives/partitions, USB Drives, and Optical Drives are listed with a familiar looking hard drive icon.
    • Open your old hard drive i.e. sda1
    • Next, open your USB Flash Drive or External Drive. i.e. sdc or sdb1
    • If you open the wrong drive, simply X out at the top right corner of the window that opens. (Just like in Windows)
    • From your old hard drive, drag and drop whatever files/folders you wish to transfer to your USB Drive's Window.

    For The Novice: The common path to your pictures, music, video, and documents folders for XP is: Documents and Settings >> All Users (or each individual name of each user, for Vista and above C:\Users\$USERNAME\[...]. CHECK All Names!) >> Documents >> You will now see My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos.


    Remember to only click once! No double clicking! Once you drag and drop your first folder, you will notice a small menu will appear giving you the option to move or copy. Choose COPY each time you drag and drop.


    YOU ARE DONE!!! Simply click Menu >> Mouse Over Shutdown >> Reboot/Turn Off Computer. Be sure to plug your USB Drive into another working windows machine to verify all data is there and transferred without corruption. Congratulations!







For computers that have UEFI as opposed to legacy BIOS, to be able to boot from your USB device you may need to disable secure boot and change UEFI to CSM Boot, not all computers and BIOS are the same, please refer to your user manual if you have one as the following steps are only one such example.

While the computer is re-starting,you will need to continually tap or hold down the particular key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer, we will use the F2 key as an example here;

After restarting the computer, when the screen goes black, press and hold down the F2 key, wait for the BIOS to load.

Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

If your computer will not boot into Windows at all, power up or restart the computer continually tap or hold down the key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer and then do the following;

Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.
 

Abhiabhash

Abhi
Thread Starter
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
8
T
Use Puppy Linux to see if you are able to recover your data "how to" below;

===================

***Required Hardware***

CD Burner (CDRW) Drive,

Blank CD,

Extra Storage Device (USB Flash Drive, External Hard Drive)


===================


1. Save these files to your Desktop/Burn Your Live CD:
2. Set your boot priority in the BIOS to CD-ROM first, Hard Drive Second

    • Start the computer/press the power button
    • Immediately start tapping the appropriate key to enter the BIOS, aka "Setup"

      (Usually shown during the "Dell" screen, or "Gateway" Screen)
    • Once in the BIOS, under Advanced BIOS Options change boot priority to:

      CD-ROM 1st, Hard Drive 2nd
    • Open your ROM drive and insert the disk
    • Press F10 to save and exit
    • Agree with "Y" to continue
    • Your computer will restart and boot from the Puppy Linux Live CD




3. Recover Your Data

  • Once Puppy Linux has loaded, it is actually running in your computer's Memory (RAM). You will see a fully functioning Graphical User Interface similar to what you normally call "your computer". Internet access may or may not be available depending on your machine, so it is recommended you print these instructions before beginning. Also, double clicking is not needed in Puppy. To expand, or open folders/icons, just click once. Puppy is very light on resources, so you will quickly notice it is much speedier than you are used to. This is normal. Ready? Let's get started.


    3a. Mount Drives
    • Click the Mount Icon located at the top left of your desktop.

    • A Window will open. By default, the "drive" tab will be forward/highlighted. Click on Mount for your hard drive.
    • Assuming you only have one hard drive and/or partition, there may be only one selection to mount.
    • USB Flash Drives usually automatically mount upon boot, but click the "usbdrv" tab and make sure it is mounted.
    • If using an external hard drive for the data recovery, do this under the "drive" tab. Mount it now.

    3b. Transfer Files.
    • At the bottom left of your desktop a list of all hard drives/partitions, USB Drives, and Optical Drives are listed with a familiar looking hard drive icon.
    • Open your old hard drive i.e. sda1
    • Next, open your USB Flash Drive or External Drive. i.e. sdc or sdb1
    • If you open the wrong drive, simply X out at the top right corner of the window that opens. (Just like in Windows)
    • From your old hard drive, drag and drop whatever files/folders you wish to transfer to your USB Drive's Window.

    For The Novice: The common path to your pictures, music, video, and documents folders for XP is: Documents and Settings >> All Users (or each individual name of each user, for Vista and above C:\Users\$USERNAME\[...]. CHECK All Names!) >> Documents >> You will now see My Music, My Pictures, and My Videos.


    Remember to only click once! No double clicking! Once you drag and drop your first folder, you will notice a small menu will appear giving you the option to move or copy. Choose COPY each time you drag and drop.


    YOU ARE DONE!!! Simply click Menu >> Mouse Over Shutdown >> Reboot/Turn Off Computer. Be sure to plug your USB Drive into another working windows machine to verify all data is there and transferred without corruption. Congratulations!






For computers that have UEFI as opposed to legacy BIOS, to be able to boot from your USB device you may need to disable secure boot and change UEFI to CSM Boot, not all computers and BIOS are the same, please refer to your user manual if you have one as the following steps are only one such example.

While the computer is re-starting,you will need to continually tap or hold down the particular key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer, we will use the F2 key as an example here;

After restarting the computer, when the screen goes black, press and hold down the F2 key, wait for the BIOS to load.

Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.

If your computer will not boot into Windows at all, power up or restart the computer continually tap or hold down the key that will allow you to access the BIOS on your computer and then do the following;

Select Security -> Secure Boot and then Disabled.

Select Advanced -> System Configuration and then Boot Mode.

Change UEFI Boot to CSM Boot.

Save the changes and Exit the BIOS, commonly F10.
Thanks bro
 
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