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Laptops: Ethernet & WiFi Question

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by 8dalejr.fan, Aug 3, 2009.

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  1. 8dalejr.fan

    8dalejr.fan Thread Starter

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    Hey y'all... I'm looking to buy a laptop soon and I am making a chart on Excel to compare the features of some of the computers I've been looking at. This brings me to my question.

    What is the difference between Ethernet that is 10/100 and one that is listed at 10/100/1000?

    And what is the difference between WiFi that says B/G and one that says B/G/N?

    I see a couple laptops that I'm interested in, but they're lacking the 1000 and the N parts. But I really don't have any idea what this means. :D

    I think N is the newer technology (correct me if I'm wrong) but here is my school's WiFi network... I think they are using the older B technology. So would that mean that the N is nice to have but not needed since the computer would run on B speed anyways?
    http://www.yorku.ca/computng/students/internet/airyork/index.html

    I'm looking to attach this laptop to my wired router at home if I'm using it there, or to connect it to the WiFi network at my school.
     
  2. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    10/100 ethernet and B/G wireless is fine.

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  3. 8dalejr.fan

    8dalejr.fan Thread Starter

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    Thanks! :)(y)
     
  4. 8dalejr.fan

    8dalejr.fan Thread Starter

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    One more question... if it just says Wireless-N card, will this work on a "B" network?
     
  5. flavallee

    flavallee Trusted Advisor

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    I don't know for sure, but I would think it should be backwards compatible.

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  6. dlsayremn

    dlsayremn

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    Flavalle is advice is very good as usual. However, if the price difference is not out of line I would go with the N wireless. In 3 to 5 years, it will probably be the norm for all the usual reasons.

    Ethernet:
    Speeds at which ethernet cards will communicate. Originaly ethernet was only 10 MBps speed. Technology developement increased that to 100MBps, but cards were made to operate 10MBps or 100Mbps to make them compatible with the older ones., With newer developements cards can now operate at 10MBps/100Mbps/1000MBps (also called GigaByte card),
    Two ethernet cards will communicate at the highest possible speed for the lowest card.
    Not that many devices with GigaByte right now.

    Wireless:
    Again primarily speed (bandwidth)difference:
    B = max 11 MBps, G = max 54 MBps, N = max 100+ MBps but operates at different frequency than B,G. (Side note: N frequency is same as A so N and A may be able to communicate)
    Most N products are backward compatible to work with B and G products. G products are compatible with B products. However they will only communicate at the lower B or G speed.

    N to B or G may be slightly better than B to B, B to G, or G to G because of improvements in N transmit/receive capabilities.
     
  7. prunejuice

    prunejuice

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    Your network would have to be "N" as well to achieve N speeds.

    1000 is "gigabit LAN"...much faster than 10/100, but again, your network would have to be gigabit as well.
     
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