Life after XP

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Phantom010

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A year after buying my Chromebox, I thought I'd make a short recap of my experience since my first thread HERE.

Well, nothing has changed. It's exactly what I expected. Zero maintenance, no bugs, no updates to make (everything is done automatically in the background), no antivirus or other type of anti-malware needed, no scans to run whatsoever. Completely worry-free and no-nonsense. I'm very happy I didn't go with Windows 10.

Like I said before, it may not be for everyone, especially if you're a hardcore gamer or video editor. But, for the Internet, Netflix, YouTube, Facebook, Word, PowerPoint, e-mail and much much more, it does the job quite efficiently. It's really fast and secure.

Microsoft is completely out of the picture for me. I couldn't be happier.

Happy New Year!
 
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Liz
What did you buy?
I'll be looking for something in 2019 for my husband so he can use the internet after Windows 7 receives no more patches in Jan. 2020.

Me, I can use my android tablet but I want to get him something with an attached keyboard. He is used to the 11" Acer netbook so I don't need something with a 14" or 15" screen.
 

Phantom010

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What did you buy?
I'll be looking for something in 2019 for my husband so he can use the internet after Windows 7 receives no more patches in Jan. 2020.

Me, I can use my android tablet but I want to get him something with an attached keyboard. He is used to the 11" Acer netbook so I don't need something with a 14" or 15" screen.
I have the Asus Chromebox2-G013U. It's powered by an Intel Core i3-5010U (5th gen) 2.10 GHz Processor, with 4 GB of RAM (can be upgraded to 16, which is overkill) and supports 4K/UHD playback. It's a Chromebox, not a Chromebook. The "box" is a desktop computer that fits in one hand, which we use as our family computer, with a large widescreen monitor, separate speakers (and subwoofer), keyboard and mouse. All peripherals you need can be used with the Chromebox, no matter the makes and models. It includes four USB 3.0 ports, a SD card slot, HDMI port, and Bluetooth capability.

If you need a laptop, then it's the Chromebook. Except for the peripherals, it's basically the same thing. It runs on Chrome OS.
 
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John
I too quit the MS 'merry-go-round' because of so many Win 10 problems.

For me, though, it's life after Win 7.
I still use Win 7 off line, but all my Internet activity is done with repurposed ex-Windows computers running a Puppy distribution using a Linux kernel.

I find I have a lot more free time where I used to have to keep up on security a lot more often.

Edit: and fix what MS broke :(
 

RT

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For me, though, it's life after Win 7.
I'll agree with that, but XP was fun to play with, so many dips and dollops, if you look around eventually you could know your way around it pretty well.

Same for Win 7 - perhaps the most stable OS on my rigs, still fun to customize, and be aware of the minor glitches (and the major ones) that is simply part and parcel of any Windows.

Have gone to Win 10, and as much as I would like to gripe about it, there's nothing much (so far) to gripe about!
For me, if get the GUI to your liking, works fine....
but that's the thing - folks don't like change, and sometime just when you've got a handle on things, they change.

Sorry, drifting off topic there...
So just want to say that there was a distinction made in the posts between Chrome box and Chrome book.
I think anyone that investigates these forums will have another solid bit of info that seemed to come out of @Cyberspace
:)
 

Phantom010

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I find I have a lot more free time where I used to have to keep up on security a lot more often.

Edit: and fix what MS broke :(
That's exactly what I mean! I was wasting so much time doing maintenance and making sure I wasn't getting infected in any way with Windows! Incredible! Everyone should just 'stop' and think about it...
 
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Mike
For me, it was just a relief to get away from XP, back in 2014, when that OS reached EOL. I'd been with it right from the beginning, in 2001; I'd never upgraded to Vista or W7, simply because at that point in time I figured it was a case of 'better the devil you know'. By April 2014, I was just fed up with it, & glad to see the back of it.

I Googled 'free operating systems'.....and was amazed at what came up in the search results. Unlike many folks, rather than 'try out' Linux, and dual-boot for a while till I got used to it, I wiped XP out of my life overnight, and dived head-first into the Linux experience. 'Twas probably helped by the fact that I didn't rely on Windows for anything important or work-related; this was purely for me.....and since I've always had an enquiring mind, the learning curve wasn't anywhere near as steep as it was generally supposed to be.

I started with Ubuntu 'Trusty', which had just been released. It ran on my old 2005 Compaq desktop extremely well; that is, until Canonical, who have a habit of customising their kernels, and who have always fancied themselves as the Linux world's answer to whatever the current Windows release happens to be, decided, quite arbitrarily, to 'drop' support for my ATI graphics. Multiple daily 'freeze-ups' rapidly became the order of the day...

Buggers!

I began casting around for a more lightweight distro (Ubuntu's Unity desktop demanded 3D hardware acceleration to be enabled at all times, which didn't help). An acquaintance on the Ubuntu Forums recommended trying out 'Puppy' Linux; the Puppy 'take' on 'Trusty' had just been released. I tried it out on my even older Inspiron 1100 lappie (from 2002), as that needed something lightweight anyway, being P4-based. It booted insanely fast, and everything just 'worked', OOTB.....and with Puppy having a complete suite of lightweight apps installed by default in the ISO, I was all set.....and very impressed, indeed. I rapidly came to the conclusion that I'd found 'the one' for me.

I've always been a 'tinkerer'; and, with the need for regular antivirus/anti-malware/system 'maintenance' removed, have had plenty of time over the last 4½ years to 'play' to my heart's content.....secure in the knowledge that the base system was absolutely bullet-proof.

I've not looked back since, and would seriously recommend trying out Linux to anyone who doesn't absolutely have to use MyCrudSoft's abomination for anything important. It's quite an eye-opener, although I would also recommend leaving Puppy alone until you have at least 'distro-hopped' a few times first, since Pup's considered 'odd' even by Linux standards!

All in all, it was the bast move I ever made. I've never regretted it, and can accomplish absolutely everything I want to with Puppy.....which has been my 'daily driver' for those 4½ years.


Mike. ;)
 
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[Miqw7394 said]
All in all, it was the bast move I ever made. I've never regretted it, and can accomplish absolutely everything I want to with Puppy.....which has been my 'daily driver' for those 4½ years.
How would you recommend someone with no Linux experience get to know and try it out?
 
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Liz
Recommend that you grab a few 8GB USB sticks, download some ISOs for different linux distros (flavors).
Grab this https://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/
Run that, with a USB stick in the Windows computer.
Then point the universal installer to one of the ISOs you've downloaded and let it "burn" the ISO to the stick.

You'd then reboot and boot from the USB stick.

You try linux out and see how you like it.

We all have our favorites, that's why I suggest you try a few and see which ones you like and seem easy.

They all have desktops just like Windows and can connect wirelessly with very little fuss. You launch the included browser and see how you get on.
 

managed

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I use this free program, it sets up a Usb stick and all you have to do is put the Linux ISO onto the stick in the correct folder. It makes a menu automatically and you can put several ISO files onto the same Usb stick, depending on the capacity of the stick of course, ideal for anyone who wants to try several different types of Linux.

http://www.easy2boot.com/introduction/

I like Puppy too, I've just been checking out Puppy Slacko 6.3.0 and it works well.
I also like Linux Mint which is a good choice for a first time Linux user.
 
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Mike
@ 8biosdrive:-

Liz & Allan have both 'pointed' you in the right direction. Basically, you can try out any Linux distro in what's call 'Live' mode; it will load the contents of the ISO (or as much as it can) into RAM, where it runs from the /tmp directory for the duration. It will load anything it needs during the course of the session from the DVD (CD in Puppy's case, because it's so small) or USB stick.

It doesn't 'touch' or affect your Windows install at all, so it's a good way to try Linux out. Just bear in mind that it doesn't run quite as fast as it would if installed to your internal hard drive.....but it allows you to try out the Linux way of doing things, and see if you like it.

The days of Linux being solely for geeks, with everything being done from the command-line, are long past; most mainstream distros (and this includes Puppy) have GUIs for doing pretty much everything nowadays. Great strides have been made in making the experience as painless as possible, for those who have only ever known Windows.

The command-line is still there, and if you want to try using it, you'll soon find out out that it's a very powerful tool in its own right.....but it's totally optional. Many folks now use Linux and never go anywhere near it, although you will find that many tutorials will give terminal options for doing things, simply because it's so much quicker...

This last couple of years, I've begun to write some of my own small utility programs.....and it's very easy to create your own GUIs with 2 tools called GTK+ & YAD (Yet Another Dialog).

Let us know how you get on, please.


Mike. ;)
 
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John
What Mike says about the command line couldn't be truer for me.
I've been using Puppy Linux for more than 3 years and have never needed or used the command line.

It just simply works well and if I can do it, most others can too :D


Hi Mike :)
 
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