Lost Worlds and New Species Found

ekim68

Mike
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Superpredator Spinosaurus revealed as first known swimming dinosaur


A new Spinosaurus fossil has revealed that this gigantic predatory dinosaur was a proficient swimmer. The first fossil of the creature’s tail has been discovered, revealing large spines that indicate a paddle shape like a crocodile’s tail – the first dinosaur to show any kind of aquatic adaptation.

Spinosaurus was one of the largest carnivores to ever stalk the Earth. It’s believed to have been up to 18 m (59 ft) long and weigh more than 20 tons, making it bigger even than the Tyrannosaurus Rex. Its most iconic feature, of course, is the big sail on its back.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
56,161

ekim68

Mike
Joined
Jul 8, 2003
Messages
56,161

Long-necked, toothless T.rex cousin unearthed in Australia


Paleontologists in Australia have uncovered a strange new species of dinosaur. This new creature is an elaphrosaur, placing it in the theropod family along with the Tyrannosaurus rex and Velociraptor – but this one had a long neck, no teeth and an unusual diet.

The new species itself doesn’t have an official name yet, but the specimen has been dubbed “Eric the Elaphrosaur,” after the dig site where it was uncovered: Eric the Red West, near Cape Otway in Victoria, Australia.
 

ekim68

Mike
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56,161

Dinosaur-dooming asteroid struck Earth at 'deadliest possible' angle



New simulations from Imperial College London have revealed the asteroid that doomed the dinosaurs struck Earth at the 'deadliest possible' angle.

The simulations show that the asteroid hit Earth at an angle of about 60 degrees, which maximised the amount of climate-changing gases thrust into the upper atmosphere.
Such a strike likely unleashed billions of tonnes of sulphur, blocking the sun and triggering the nuclear winter that killed the dinosaurs and 75 per cent of life on Earth 66 million years ago.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
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Messages
56,161

Red Lion: Archaeologists 'find London's earliest theatre'


Mr White, who directed the work, said: "After nearly 500 years, the remains of the Red Lion playhouse, which marked the dawn of Elizabethan theatre, may have finally been found.

"The strength of the combined evidence - archaeological remains of buildings, in the right location, of the right period - seem to match up with characteristics of the playhouse recorded in early documents."
 

ekim68

Mike
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56,161

Tiny songbird is East Asia’s ‘oldest’ carved work of art


A miniature bird sculpted out of burnt bone in China about 13,500 years ago is the oldest known figurine from East Asia, researchers who discovered it in a refuse heap near an archeological site said.

The carefully crafted depiction of a songbird on a pedestal — smaller than an almond kernel — was found among burnt animal remains and fragments of ceramics at Lingjing in north ce ntral Henan Province, an area thought to have been home to some of China’s earliest civilizations.
 

ekim68

Mike
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56,161

Scientists find huge ring of ancient shafts near Stonehenge


Archaeologists said Monday that they have discovered a major prehistoric monument under the earth near Stonehenge that could shed new light on the origins of the mystical stone circle in southwestern England.
Experts from a group of British universities led by the University of Bradford say the site consists of at least 20 huge shafts, more than 10 meters (32 feet) in diameter and 5 meters (16 feet) deep, forming a circle more than 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) in diameter.
 

ekim68

Mike
Joined
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Messages
56,161

Divers find evidence of America's first mines — and skeletons — in underwater caves


Experts and cave divers in Mexico's Yucatan peninsula have found ocher mines that are some of the oldest on the continent. Ancient skeletons were found in the narrow, twisting labyrinths of now-submerged sinkhole caves.

Since skeletal remains like "Naia," a young woman who died 13,000 years ago, were found over the last 15 years, archaeologists have wondered how they wound up in the then-dry caves.
 

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