Lost Worlds and New Species Found

ekim68

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Fossilized dinosaur found sitting on eggs – with embryos inside

While we've seen fossilized dinosaur eggs and embryos before, paleontologists have now discovered an unprecedented three-for-one – a fossilized dinosaur parent sitting on a nest of eggs, in which embryos are present.

Unearthed in southern China's Jiangxi Province, the fossils include the partial skeleton of a presumably adult oviraptorosaur, which is "crouched in a bird-like brooding posture" over a batch of approximately 24 eggs. Within at least seven of those eggs, bones or partial skeletons of unhatched embryos are present.
 

ekim68

Mike
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45,000-year-old human genomes reveal extent of Neanderthal interbreeding


Two new genetic studies have shed light on just how often our ancestors got frisky with Neanderthals. Scientists analyzed the genomes of 45,000-year-old human remains found in caves in Czechia and Bulgaria, including the oldest known genome of a modern human, and found that they all had relatively recent Neanderthal ancestors.

Today, modern humans, or Homo sapiens, are the only living species of human, but that wasn’t always the case – for hundreds of thousands of years we shared the planet with a whole family of related species. While there was no doubt conflict, and we may have even contributed to the extinction of some species, we also got along very well at times.

 

ekim68

Mike
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2.5 billion T. rex inhabited the planet, researchers say


For the first time, scientists have estimated how many Tyrannosaurus rex, the so-called king of dinosaurs, once roamed the Earth.

Why it matters: The number is staggering: 2.5 billion Tyrannosaurus rex lived and died during the roughly 2.4 million years the species survived on the planet, according to a new study set to be published in the journal Science on Friday.
 

ekim68

Mike
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AI tool offers clues to mystery of who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls


A new method of handwriting analysis developed by researchers from the University of Groningen is offering fresh clues as to who wrote the Dead Sea Scrolls. Testing the machine learning tool on one of the most famous ancient scrolls has revealed not one but two scribes were responsible for the ancient text.

The Great Isaiah Scroll was among the first Dead Sea Scrolls to be discovered in 1946. It is one of the largest and best preserved of all the scrolls, presenting the oldest complete copy of the Book of Isaiah.
 

ekim68

Mike
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Negev Desert archaeological site illuminates an important chapter in modern humans' origin


The Boker Tachtit archaeological excavation site in Israel's central Negev desert holds clues to one of the most significant events in human history: the spread of modern humans, Homo sapiens, from Africa into Eurasia, and the subsequent demise of Neanderthal populations in the region. Researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science and the Max Planck Society, led by Prof. Elisabetta Boaretto, together with Dr. Omry Barzilai of the Israel Antiquities Authority, returned to Boker Tachtit nearly 40 years after it was first excavated. Using advanced sampling and dating methods, they offer a new chronological framework for this important chapter in our anthropological evolution. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study suggests that Homo sapiens and Neanderthals were far from strangers.
 

ekim68

Mike
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Dozens of new viruses discovered in 15,000-year-old glacier ice


Scientists have collected viruses from almost-15,000-year-old ice samples, taken from glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau. Dozens of species were found to be unknown to science, which could provide an intriguing look back at the history of viral evolution.

Glaciers are fantastic at preserving deep history, as they trap particles of dust, traces of gas, microbes, and plant matter from different time periods. Since these layers build up over time, scientists can drill and study ice cores to learn a huge amount about ancient climates, what was in the atmosphere, and what kinds of life existed at various points of history.
 

ekim68

Mike
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7-meter-wide "spear-mouth" pterosaur was Australia's largest flying reptile


Paleontologists have discovered the largest known flying reptile that ever took to the Australian skies. Named Thapunngaka shawi, this “fearsome dragon” sported a 7-m (23-ft) wingspan and a jaw full of awful jagged teeth.

Although they’re not technically dinosaurs themselves, pterosaurs soared over their heads for hundreds of millions of years. These flying reptiles ranged in size from a cat to a Cessna, and were the first known vertebrates to evolve powered flight.

pter.jpg
 

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