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Lynne Hale's daughter has a homework question!!

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Lynne Hale, Sep 22, 2003.

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  1. Lynne Hale

    Lynne Hale Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    Hi, I'm Lynne Hale's daughter Sandy,
    I'm doing my IT homework at the moment and am not sure about the answer to a question. Here is the question, I hope you can answer it for me. If you could I would be extremely grateful.(y)

    Will an operating system using two processors operate at twice the speed? Give reasons for your answer.

    Thanks.
    Sandy
     
  2. Lynne Hale

    Lynne Hale Thread Starter

    Joined:
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    I also have another question. Here it is.

    List some different ways of classifying operating systems.

    Thanks.
     
  3. Squashman

    Squashman Trusted Advisor

    Joined:
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    19,783
    Desktop, Workstation, Server.
     
  4. funkenbooty

    funkenbooty

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    W:D W! Is this a sign of the times or what??? I wish I would have had the Internet around when I was in school. I might have done my homework or should say farmed out my homework to strangers on the Internet.

    List some different ways of classifying operating systems

    How about Multitasking or Singletasking operating systems.
    Open source operating systems like Linux
    32 bit and 64 bit operating systems
    That's all I can think of.
    That first question I'm just guessing but I think that two CPU's will be faster but maybe not twice as fast. Go look at this site for info about Intel's dual processors.

    I also like using howstuffworks for finding out how stuff works.

    :D (y)
     
  5. plejon

    plejon

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2001
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    No, a dual processor will not work twice as fast as a single processor.

    Reasons:
    1) The dual processor requires extra software to divide the work between the processors (load balancing). This slows things down a bit. Compare it to painting your house: two people won't do it twice as fast as one. When the second guy comes in, you will have to explain him how you want it painted, divide the work, etc. That takes time
    2) The software programs you run should be adapted for use with dual processors. Otherwise, they will just run on one, and you won't notice any increase in speed at all. Specifically, instead of using one big task, they have to be divided in smaller subtasks (threads) that can be executed independently on seperate processors.

    OS classification
    - graphical / text based
    - single user / multi user
    - stand alone / network
    - processor specific (designed for Intel x86, Sunsparc, motorola processors)
     
  6. Lynne Hale

    Lynne Hale Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2001
    Messages:
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    Thanks very much everyone for your help! I did try to work it out but I'm not very knowledgable on networks, and didn't know where to start looking on the Internet, so I came here!! Thanks again, I have a few more questions too but I'll ask them at another time.
    Sandy.
     
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