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Mainboard temperature too high?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Buffy, Mar 17, 2003.

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  1. Buffy

    Buffy Thread Starter

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    Hi,

    I just downloaded and used a program called SANDRA and under Mainboard Information it said the "Mainboard temperature is too high". The board temperature is 57 C/ 134.6 F and it says anything over 50 C is too high. What should I do? I'm a computer idiot, so any recommendations would be appreciated. I'm not sure what this means. :confused:
     
  2. bassetman

    bassetman Moderator (deceased) - Gone but never forgotten

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    I like Ssandra as a prog, but I have heard not all reccomendations are valid.

    Please wait for more comments.

    John
     
  3. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    Well, if it's accurately reading the temperature , it's certainly too high! I get pretty excited when the MB temperature hits anything above the low 40's. :rolleyes: I don't even want to see my processor temperature in that range...

    I'd open it up and see if all the fans are running, blow out the dust bunnies, and perhaps even take a temperature reading with another thermometer a couple places near the MB, around the processor, and see what readings you get. I suspect the temperature sensor may not be reading correctly...
     
  4. ourhouse

    ourhouse

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    keep the case open for an hour and then check sandra again to see if your temps drop. if it does, ide advise to leave your case open or get an additional case fan.
     
  5. griffinspc

    griffinspc

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  6. JSanguancheu

    JSanguancheu

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    On an average system, you should be getting an idle temp in the range of 45-55 C. If your cpu temp gets over 65C, then start worrying.

    The temp depends on many factors..
    1. The heatsink attached to the CPU
    2. The fan attached to the heatsink
    3. The type of thermal grease used between heatsink and CPU
    4. The number of case fans
    5. Whether the CPU is idling or being actively used
    6. The average temperature of the room the PC is in
     
  7. Buffy

    Buffy Thread Starter

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    Well I downloaded that Motherboard Monitor program and it showed the temp the same as SANDRA did. I opened up the case (first time I've ever done that) and have left it off for 45 minutes so far and the temp has only gone down 4 degrees. I looked inside with a flash light and all I could see and feel was one fan and it's definitely working but it's dusty, how many fans should a computer have? How would I install another fan if I need it?

    My computer is an HP Pavilion 531w.
     
  8. griffinspc

    griffinspc

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    I'm curious what the temp reading is for your processor.

    In answer to your question, "how many fans should a computer have?. It depends on the computer. Most get along just fine with the power supply fan and a processor fan. Some have only the power supply fan and just a heat sink on the processor.

    When you say
    is this the power supply fan your referring to at the back of the case or a small fan on top of the processor inside?

    Either way, dust is a computer killer. If any fan is surrounded by and coated with dust it's a very good idea to remove it all. This includes the motherboard and the entire insides of your machine. You can do this with a can of compressed air or with a vaccuum and a small brush. Be careful in both cases. With compressed air make sure to hold the can upright so you don't spray liquid all over and with a vaccuum don't get to carried away with the suction.

    I'm not trying to scare you off, puter parts aren't that delicate. Just use common sense and you'll be fine.

    Do you know what type of processor you have? Athlons run at a much higher temp than Intel's and usually have a fan attached.
     
  9. Buffy

    Buffy Thread Starter

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    It's the power supply fan.

    I got rid of all the dust covering the fan and the temp dropped one degree.

    It's an Intel Celeron 1300MHz.
     
  10. ourhouse

    ourhouse

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    you posted above that opening your case dropped your temps 4 degrees. 4 degrees celsuis is a good amount of drop for just opening your case. This is evidence that your case is a little warm inside. just getting one intake fan in the front will probably drop the temps even more and another exhaust fan will do justice. Fans are cheap nowadays. worth the investment ide say. Newer cases comes with 3 - 4 fans now. older cases has none except for the power supply fan.
     
  11. griffinspc

    griffinspc

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  12. joevandam

    joevandam

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    do you have any case fans installed in that tower.
     
  13. joevandam

    joevandam

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    the reason why you are running so hot is that hp does not come with additional fans installed in that tower. if you look closer inside that tower you should have one place in the the front of your tower, and one at the rear of the tower. and its usely a 80 m fans,on your motherboard you would probably have one or two, 3 prong male for one type of plug in, the other you can hook up from your power suppy, and thats a 4 prong.what i am saying is the tower has to have a flow of cool air going throw it.
     
  14. joevandam

    joevandam

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    did that help you with the extra fans
     
  15. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    I would check the temp in the BIOS to confirm that reading if possible; press F1 or F2 to enter the BIOS when the computer boots up. It may actually be the CPU temp you are seeing mis-identified. What is currently listed as the CPU temp in either SiSandra or Mainboard Monitor?

    HP's have bad cooling; thats a given, and in my experience the sensors get misread by software monitors.
     
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