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Modem and router not working proberly together

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Balvenie, Jan 12, 2011.

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  1. Balvenie

    Balvenie Thread Starter

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    Hello out there

    You might be my last chance to crack this problem I'm facing

    I have a Netgear CVD31T modem delivered by my internet provider. I can't change any settings on the modem. My connection speed is 30 gb up and 5 GB down.
    Until now I used a Linksys WRT54GV ver. 2 router to share my connection between my computers and NAS server and it worked ok. In speed tests I normally get approx 25 - 28 GB speed. To optain more speed on my LAN I want to buy a GB router. And here started my problems. First I tried a D-link DIR655, then a Netgear WNDR3700 and latest a Linksys E3000. I all 3 occations my WAN speed droped drasticaly down to between 3 - 5 GB speed, at under a ping test I have a loss of between 10 - 30 % and time on approx 50 ms.

    If I connect my PC directly to the modem or re-connect my old router it works perfect. I have tried to replace cables etc. etc.

    Does anyone know a solution???

    A desperate man
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    3 - 5 GB speed is 24 - 40 Gbps is 24,000 - 40,000 Mbps. I don't know how I survive with my 12 Mbps cable internet.

    I also think you are mixing your bits and bytes as well as "gigas" and "megas," and if you want us to understand you, you will need to get that straightened out.
     
  3. Balvenie

    Balvenie Thread Starter

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    My mistake

    My download speed is supposed to be arround 30 MS, and upload 5 MS. Before I had approx 22 - 25 MS download speed with my old router. That has now gone down to 1 - 3 MS

    Hope that is better?
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    MS means Mega bits per second (Mbps)?

    Don't know why the other router's are having such difficulty. One thing you can do is use the router that gives decent internet performance and add a gigabit ethernet switch, to which you connect all your (wired) computers and other devices. If you are stuck with the new router and want to use it as the switch the key things are to connect to its LAN ports, not its WAN, and disable its Dhcp server. We can post the complete description if you need it.

    With the switch in front of the router all your LAN to LAN traffic goes only through the switch, never reaching the router.
     
  5. Balvenie

    Balvenie Thread Starter

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    Sounds like a solution that I could try. The point is that I need more bandwith between my NAS server and my WD Live media player. That is why I thought of replacing the old router with a "better" one
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I understand your motivation. Using the better router as a switch and optionally wireless access point should get the same results.

    EDIT: FWIW I'm doing the same thing because I want 'N' wireless but that router has a broken WAN.

    JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

    For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router
     
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