More RAM versus larger cache

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8biosdrive

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I am looking for a new Windows 10 desktop PC. My primary computer tasks involve writing in Word, some work in Excel, some low graphics-intensive software, and internet use (email, web surfing). For this kind of usage, would I do better with more Ram (12 GB, DDR4, 2666MHz) or with 8 GB Ram plus 16 GB Intel integrated cache (Optane Memory)? Both systems would come with 8th Generation Intel Core i5-8400 processor, Windows 10 Home 64 bit English, 3.5" 1 TB 7200 rpm Hard Drive, Intel® UHD Graphics 630 and DVD-RW Drive. Thanks for any help with this.
 
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Start with 8 GB of RAM at stock DDR4 speeds (DDR4-2133) and an SSD for the operating system. Use a hard drive for secondary storage. I have an i3-3225 that will still be overkill what you do. I have switched between i7-3770 and i3-3225 and I can't tell the difference with office applications. An NVMe (aka PCIe x4) SSD will be overkill. A SATA SSD is overwhelming plenty for your needs, but load times for the operating system and applications will load up to 10 times faster. If you have a few dozen tabs opened in a web browser, then you should consider 16 GB of RAM instead of 8 GB.
 

8biosdrive

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Yes, the combination of SSD for the operating system and hdd for data storage seems to be very efficient. The systems I described are preconfigured Dell systems. It might be worth the extra money to custom configure one. But my question was geared at better understanding under what usage conditions the cache would be advantageous versus more ram without the cache. Maybe it's always better to have more ram and the cache?
 

crjdriver

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Start with 8 GB of RAM at stock DDR4 speeds (DDR4-2133) and an SSD for the operating system. Use a hard drive for secondary storage. I have an i3-3225 that will still be overkill what you do. I have switched between i7-3770 and i3-3225 and I can't tell the difference with office applications. An NVMe (aka PCIe x4) SSD will be overkill. A SATA SSD is overwhelming plenty for your needs, but load times for the operating system and applications will load up to 10 times faster. If you have a few dozen tabs opened in a web browser, then you should consider 16 GB of RAM instead of 8 GB.
Stock ram speed for the 8xxx processors [which the poster is asking about] is 2666 not 2133 per the intel spec sheet;
https://ark.intel.com/products/126687/Intel-Core-i5-8400-Processor-9M-Cache-up-to-4-00-GHz-
 
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Stock ram speed for the 8xxx processors [which the poster is asking about] is 2666 not 2133 per the intel spec sheet;
...
Yes that is true. For office work, nobody will know and won't be able to tell the difference. Also, some memory modules are DDR4-2133 and others are DDR4-2666. Doing research is required if want DDR4-2666.
 
Joined
May 28, 2018
Messages
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Yes, the combination of SSD for the operating system and hdd for data storage seems to be very efficient. The systems I described are preconfigured Dell systems. It might be worth the extra money to custom configure one. But my question was geared at better understanding under what usage conditions the cache would be advantageous versus more ram without the cache. Maybe it's always better to have more ram and the cache?
Go to the following address.
Code:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X5UrtwW-zJs
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWqO36Zj65k
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwy4ujt0qHM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka1mfkJOOsw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6__ZVMfcE3g
Building your own computer is going to be easier to fix if a part fails. Fixing a part like a power supply in Dell computer is not going to be easy and cheap. Dell gets paid to install trial software, so the computers that you buy is being paid by other companies. Dell makes proprietary parts for power supply and add-on cards, so Dell confines you into their ecosystem.
 
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