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Motherboard Recommendation

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by tehon3299, Apr 15, 2003.

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  1. tehon3299

    tehon3299 Thread Starter

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    What kind of motherboards do you guys recommend? I am looking at the Soyo KT400. What else is there? I am looking for something with at least 3 DDR RAM slots.

    Thanks
     
  2. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

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  3. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    There is only one motherboard that I will recommend to anyone at this time. I wish others would take my advise on this.

    It's the Epox 8RDA or the 8RDA+, this motherboard has dual channel DDR support, support for 400mhz FSB (with bios upgrade), 6 USB 2.0 ports, Onboard lan, 6 PCI slots, 8X-4X AGP, nforce2 chipset, dma 133 support, excellent overclockability and stability, soundstorm onboard sound (comparable to audigy). It's the fastest Athlon board out at this time. Not only that, but it's cheap to boot.

    Newegg has this board along with a 1700+ thoroughbred revision B Athlon for $130. Just the sound on this board is worth around that.


    The Athlon thoroughbred rev b's are known to be avid overclockers since it seems AMD was relabeling 2400+,2600+,and 2800+ chips as less than 2400+ chips in order to meet demand while revamping production techniques. Right now I have one in the living room clocked at 2490mhz, that means it was meant to run at 1470mhz as a 1700+, but it's running stable at 2490mhz without overheating with just fans. Some people have got these chips up to 3300+mhz.
    I just overclocked it a little since 2 ghz is enough for me.

    1700+ at 1470mhz
    2800+ at 2490mhz

    but I'm not recommending you overclock of course.

    Hell, it's so cheap, buy two of them, you'll be glad you did!
     
  4. tehon3299

    tehon3299 Thread Starter

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    How easy is it to overclock? How do you do it? I'm very computer literate and I'm obviously building my own, I've just never tried to overclock a processor.
     
  5. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    Excuse me, it was AccessMicro that has it on sale with the thoroughbred, http://www.accessmicro.com/productinfo.php3?ProductId=AMBUNEP17XPT

    Has a good heatsink with the package as well.

    Well, some people are strongly against it. But the bios on the Epox 8RDA is the strongest overclocking board on the market. What you do is slowly bump the multiplier or the FSB up.

    The rule is
    FSB X Multiplier = Mhz
    so with a fsb at 166 (333) and a multiplier of 13 you would get
    166 X 13 = 2158mhz

    The 8RDA rules because it locks the FSB of the memory and the graphics in place so that you can bump it higher without problems.

    Increasing the multiplier just overclocks the CPU, while increasing the FSB affects the whole system. Therefore, as long as you keep the CPU in a good thermal range, (mine runs around 42C under load) you can go pretty high. You should be able to reach 2400+ speeds at the default voltage with a thoughbred Rev B.

    Hold on, I'll find a guide that will show you what to expect from your CPU when you get it.
     
  6. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

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    That's right. If you want stability, reliability, long system life, no voided warranties then get a faster cpu, more/faster memory, faster HDD(ATA133) and a better video card. It's not worth the risk. Do you want to drive your car as fast as it will go till it breaks(or CRASHES) or do you want it to last until you can get another one WHEN you want to?
     
  7. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    Whew, found one...


    http://www.hexus.net/review.php?review=536&page=1


    Demand is a strange animal. Sometimes both Intel and AMD have to fulfill demand for various grade of CPU by using certain wafers, and like any cost-conscious business, AMD try to minimise production costs by employing the minimum number of fabrication lines as is possible. Therefore it's quite possible to earmark a particularly pure wafer, initially destined for XP2400+ speeds, to lower speeds. Market demand dictates all.

    Wouldn't it be fantastic if we, the enthusiast sector, could identify high-grade XP cores that were downgraded to lower speed XPs in order to fill market demand ?. We'd be looking at relatively cheap CPUs with the potential to emulate the basic clock speeds of the more expensive processors.


    Seems yes we can, it's on the tag on the processor!!!
     
  8. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    StillLearnin' ,

    You have a lot to learn, last time you said I had 2 overclocked systems, when in fact I have about 50 overclocked systems. I oversee 3 corporations.

    To get a $150 dollar CPU from a $30 w/bundle CPU is definitely worth the risk.

    Besides clocking a relabeled 2800+ cpu as a 2800+ cpu can hardly be considered overclocking, can it?[
     
  9. tehon3299

    tehon3299 Thread Starter

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    That's awesome. Thanks a lot!
     
  10. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    StillLearnin'

    I'm sorry, that was rude of me. If you don't overclock the FSB and just bump the multiplier, you affect nothing but the CPU, therefore, you don't risk any of your cards. Overclocking the FSB can affect the cards and I wouldn't recommend going too high on a FSB overclock.

    Even though, preformance wise, a FSB overclock is more efficient.
     
  11. StillLearnin'

    StillLearnin'

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    gotrootdude:

    No problem. I just try to emphasize the drawbacks because the majority of users are NOT technically trained to overclock and( as we observe quite frequently) ruin their systems. When qualified personnel are discussing "overclocking" in a forum thread, it does sound enticing, easy to do and quite "harmless". And yes, isn't it great to latch onto "underclocked" chips for a cheaper price.

    I'm not out to diss you, however from our viewpoint we disagree with the above quotes because:

    For instance, we have 60+ high-end systems, along with servers, in a physicians clinic alone. After the warranty or maintenance agreement expires, assuming they don't upgrade to new systems, the oncall/onsite tech support is $110.00/hr - standard charge here. Regular in-shop charges start at $75.00/hr. According to your calculations, the $120.00 saved barely covers a 1 hr. onsite charge( or pickup, repair, delivery charge). "If" (one hopes not) 6 systems malfunction, the diagnostic time alone can accrue 4-6 hrs. of charges($400-$660) not counting component replacement costs. Say 6 mobos or cpus/$125.00ea = $750 + ($400-$600) + resetup time( maybe 2-4 hrs. per machine) = lots of dough. Because situations like this can happen, we just don't feel that the "OCing" justifies the cost. And yes, it IS possible to do very minor multiplier bumping without doing any damage.(No one said anything about "personal" systems).
     
  12. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    We had a few "tech support" companies do that kinda stuff to us too, but with the price of new PC's as low as they are. We now rely on raid and hourly backups. We don't warranty anything as it's cheaper to just thow a new PC together. Plus we keep a couple of spares on the side to throw in in a pinch. 90% of the time, it's a software misconfiguration and not hardware, and then when it's hardware, 90% of the time it's networking. After getting stung over and over on tech support, we finally trained our own.

    Building a high end server on a weekend, then cloning a disk, cost less than one persons weekly pay. Plus, ever notice how most software company "tech support" personel never seem to be able to truly help you get the bugs out.

    Still friends?
     
  13. MysticEyes

    MysticEyes Banned

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    I would avoid Soyo and ECS, way too many problems and poor support.
     
  14. gotrootdude

    gotrootdude

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    That's your opinion, the 8RDA's are the fastest and most configurable boards available for the AMD chips at this time. No problems with the one's I bought. I'll tell you what to avoid, PCchips , avoid them like the plague. I'll agree with you on the SOYO's. Asus rocks qualitywise, and used to be top, but their nforce2 boards are not listed on nvidia's site as soundstorm certified, so they must be having some problems with the sound.
     
  15. tehon3299

    tehon3299 Thread Starter

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    If you just bump the multiplier and not the FSB, then how fast can you get the 1700+ up to?
     
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