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Moving N-adapter from USB hub to computer port increases speed from 6 Mbps to 24 Mbps

Discussion in 'Networking' started by rasmasyean, Jan 8, 2012.

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  1. rasmasyean

    rasmasyean Thread Starter

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    Hello,

    I plugged in an N-adapter to a USB hub and it gave me a 6 Mbps in www.speedtest.net. I thought this was kind of slow for what the adapter "claimed" (300Mbps). But then I plugged it directly into a computer port and it showed 24 Mbps (my internet plan is 25 Mbps), which I suppose it's pretty close or even "maxed" because it's not really 25 Mbps all the time, right?

    Is this normal? Is my USB hub crappy/old? Would it make a difference if I get a new USB hub?

    Thanks.
     
  2. dlsayremn

    dlsayremn

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,862
    Since most of the older USB hubs only suppoert USB 1.0 or 1.1 even if they are connected into a USB 2.0 port on your computer, that would be about normal for a USB 2.0 device. Have a similar problem when I connect my USB 2.0 Webcam using a hub.

    A new hub might help if it is rated for USB 2.0.

    The 300 Mbps is for the connection between your wireless adapter and your wireless router if both are using wireless N in the 5.0 Mhz range.
    Wireless N tech in the 2.4 Mhz range (wireless G) would only give a max of 150 Mbps for that connection. (Uses 3 channels)

    24 Mbps for a rated 25 Mbps connection is excellant. Anything over 90% of your rated is very good. 85% is good. 80% is OK, but might be improved.
     
  3. rasmasyean

    rasmasyean Thread Starter

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    Is there some type of "handshaking overhead" for wireless connections such that you cannot get 100% as with a wired connection? Also, does it reduce the "% of internet bandwidth usage" if you go through a router vs. directly to a cable modem? What about router-switch-switch-switch...
     
  4. rasmasyean

    rasmasyean Thread Starter

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    Oh, and also, I'm using it primarily as an "USB extention cord". Does the cable itself have to be USB 2.0 / 3.0 as well? If I can get a hold of an old USB extention cord, will it work?
     
  5. Elvandil

    Elvandil

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    Every frequency of a radio transmission has a maximum amount of data that it is able to carry. In addition to that, the amount is reduced if error-correction and interference become a problem since the same data must then be retransmitted.

    How Can I Get 300 Mbps Speed on My 802.11n Network?
     
  6. rasmasyean

    rasmasyean Thread Starter

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    So a USB cable carries and RF signal like a Coax? I thought it was digital serial signals.
     
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