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Need help desperately with Linux/ windows booting

Discussion in 'Linux and Unix' started by ConspiracySmurf, Dec 14, 2018.

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  1. tecknurd

    tecknurd

    Joined:
    May 28, 2018
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    The drive that is labeled as UUI is usually a LIVE Linux configuration and I think you made a mistake. It should be a USB flash drive and you have to quadruple check that it is really the USB flash drive that it is going to store the LIVE Linux boot disk. If you don't want to make the same mistake again, disconnect all drives but Windows and rerun the program to put Linux ISO on the USB flash drive. After booting from the USB flash drive that has the LIVE Linux, you can install Linux. Watch any youtube videos of the process of downloading an ISO of Linux, putting it on a USB flash drive or DVD/CD disc, and then installing Linux on the hard drive or SSD will help you to do the process properly.

    RAID from the BIOS has its pros like booting into Windows and only Windows. The cons, Linux won't see the RAID that you set up from the BIOS. Linux will see the drives in the array and never the RAID. Installing dmraid in Linux, you can see the BIOS RAID. Your setup is an improper install of Linux and I don't know what will happen if you install and run dmraid. Its best to setup RAID in Windows (Dynamic Disks) or Linux (mdadm), but not through the BIOS. If want access to the data on the BIOS RAID array, you have to install Windows on another drive. Then access the RAID array in Windows.

    When doing a multi-boot, disconnect the data cable of all drives but the drive you want the operating system install on. When this is done correctly, you can choose what drive to boot to in the BIOS. You can later set up either GRUB (modern based boot loader for Linux and other non-Windows OS) or BCD (Windows Vista or higher bootloader) to make the selection process easier to boot to any operating system.

    In Linux, at a terminal type fdisk -l and post the output. Also type lsblk and post the output.
     
  2. ConspiracySmurf

    ConspiracySmurf Thread Starter

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    Dec 14, 2018
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    You guys have taught me alot thank you to everyone so here's the latest lol I got a windows 7 repair CD (pictured) has step by step printed instructions but just wanted to ask here also 20181217_174307.jpg
     
  3. tecknurd

    tecknurd

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    A repair disc is not what you need. Also I'm not sure that is a legit disc because there is text bleeding through the disc label. You need a Windows installation disc. Buy an authentic Windows 7 if you don't have one. Install Windows on one of the drives that is not part of the RAID array.
     
  4. ConspiracySmurf

    ConspiracySmurf Thread Starter

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    Understand but let ask this. I dont really care about keeping windows I just care about getting the files off of it what's the best way to do that
     
  5. plodr

    plodr

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    First Name:
    Liz
    The best way to get files from a hard drive that will not boot is to hook it up by a USB adapter to a booted and working computer.
    Use Windows Explorer to locate the files on the USB connected hard drive and copy these files either to a USB stick or an external portable hard drive.
    I always copy and never move. Why? If the computer or connected device has a glitch and you are moving, the file will be lost. If the glitch happens while you are copying, the file still remains on the original device and you can try to copy it again, losing nothing.

    In the future, it is always good to have a copy of any file you think you might want stored off the computer hard drive. If the drive dies and won't spin up, you won't get your files.
     
  6. managed

    managed Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Allan
    Without setting up the Raid array somehow I don't think you will be able to get those files you want.
     
  7. tecknurd

    tecknurd

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    The way BIOS RAID works is through Windows. You are required to use Windows in order to access the RAID that you have setup. I can't guarantee that Linux will have access to it even though there is dmraid. I'm not saying to permanently to install Windows. I'm saying to temporary install Windows to get access to the data on your RAID array. In Windows, copy the data from your RAID array to USB hard drive such as the following.

    Rosewill 3.5 Inch Hard Drive Enclosure to USB 3.0 / eSATA -- https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817182247
    Seagate BarraCuda ST2000DM006 2TB -- https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822178993

    Format the USB external drive as either as FAT32 or NTFS. Don't use exFAT. Use NTFS if the files are larger than a gigabyte. Linux will be able to access NTFS and FAT32. Since this is a new drive uncheck quick format to make sure all sectors are OK. Formatting will take a long time. If the format is successful, then you can rely on the drive to keep data you are going to store on this drive.

    This is the best way to do it.
     
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