Need help hardwiring new house

KrisK91

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Dec 1, 2020
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Hello! I am moving to a new home soon and would really like to hardwire my house. Would it be easier to run multiple wires to each room or would it be easier to just run one wire to each room and connect that end ran to the room to a network switch to create more open ports for each room?

I hope this makes sense.
Thank you!
 

TerryNet

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What kind of "wire(s)"? If you mean ethernet cable(s) make sure all 8 wires in the cable are good. If I were doing it I'd run and connect one cable and run a spare cable in case the original one goes bad some day.

I'm not sure such cabling makes a lot of sense nowadays. So many devices rely on Wi-Fi and so many people want to use Wi-Fi even for devices that support ethernet that a household probably has to have good wireless (mesh) coverage. Maybe it makes more sense to just run a few cables to the farthest points of the house or a room or two where you are sure that ethernet (if that's what you meant) will be used.
 

KrisK91

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What kind of "wire(s)"? If you mean ethernet cable(s) make sure all 8 wires in the cable are good. If I were doing it I'd run and connect one cable and run a spare cable in case the original one goes bad some day.

I'm not sure such cabling makes a lot of sense nowadays. So many devices rely on Wi-Fi and so many people want to use Wi-Fi even for devices that support ethernet that a household probably has to have good wireless (mesh) coverage. Maybe it makes more sense to just run a few cables to the farthest points of the house or a room or two where you are sure that ethernet (if that's what you meant) will be used.
Yes, I am talking about ethernet cables. It is a 3 bedroom home, living room, kitchen, basement with 2 additional rooms, and a sunroom. Would it make sense to run wires from the Modem/Router/8 Port Switch and just run 1 cable to each room and then in each room have a switch to expand the hardwire? I would like to hardwire as many devices as I can or at least have the ethernet cable ran to each room so if I needed to hardwire something it would be simple. Like I would really like to have the living room tv streaming device to be hardwired as well as the gaming systems I have. So let's say I would like to hardwire 5 devices in the living room. Would it make sense to run 5 wires from the modem/router/switch area to the living room, or just run one ethernet cable to the living room and then have a switch hooked at the end in the living room to enable more ports for the said 5 devices I would like to connect in the living room?
I also have a WIFI Mesh system that I would most likely like to have hardwired so they can have the most strong signal possible.

I hope this makes more sense.
 

zx10guy

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The rule of thumb is cabling is cheap. The labor isn't. I wouldn't run anything less than 4 per room. As it's always better to have more options than none. That said, because you have multiple cables to a room, if a cable for some reason goes bad, you're not up the proverbial creek. And cabling can go bad for a number of reasons. I've been affected by this myself personally. My vacation home had a RG6 run just go bad after years of no issues. Thankfully, the sub for the builder pulled a spare and that saved me from tearing up my walls to pull a new cable from the external DMARC of the house in.

Also, Category cabling can be used for a multitude of things such as Smart home tasks and extension of audio and video.

Don't forget the wireless component. I would have ceiling drops where an access point would be ideally positioned. Higher end APs are designed to be ceiling mounted as their RF signal pattern is downward facing.

I would not pull anything less than Category 6 cabling.

I would think about how much expansion and complexity you want in this system. Have the cabling pulled to a logical spot in your home that can be closed off, is central to your ISP cabling, has power, and if applicable good ventilation. Consider having all cabling from the various locations to be terminated into a patch panel.

Depending on your floor plan, consider conduits in places to allow future pulling of cabling in an easier manner.
 

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