1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Need Help with XPS 410

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by sergeantwupass, Jan 30, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,669
    You're right. I never saw that on the site before.

    I just tried it and it ID'd my board, but it's a standard Intel board. I saved the link and will try it on the 1st proprietary Intel board I get in for service.

    Thanks for the link. (y)
     
  2. sergeantwupass

    sergeantwupass Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    i found the board number, under a small sticker under my video card. Its an intel DP965SB which i can't find in their motherboard listings. :( sorry for misleading you, i don't want to try to install a BIOS from the DP965LT because my luck my computer would explode
    :eek:
    newegg doesn't refund processors, so im gonna fufill my long lost dream, have a custom built computer, im buying a new motherboard, case, and powersupply. anyone have any suggestions so i don't screw up like this again.
     
  3. win2kpro

    win2kpro

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2005
    Messages:
    11,669
    To the best of my knowledge, all "mass produced" machine manufacturers such as Dell, Gateway, HP, etc. use manufacturer proprietary motherboards. If a motherboard is manufacturer proprietary the board will not be listed on the board manufacturers site and will have a different designation as you have just determined.

    I have seen numerous instances both here at TSG and other support sites where people have mistakenly believed that their proprietary board was the same as a board manufacturers standard board and have tried to update the BIOS from the board manufacturers site, rather than from the system builder site.

    Intel explains how to identify boards using the BIOS string for identification which is discussed here;

    http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/sb/CS-009015.htm

    The only way to keep from making mistakes with a new build is to take the time to thoroughly research to see if a particular processor is supported by a particular board. I see it quite often here at TSG and other tech sites where people purchase a processor that is not supported by a specific board, even though the supported processor information is available at the board manufacturers site.

    Part of the problem is because a board manufacturer may say in the general description of the board that for instance the board supports Core 2 Duo processors, however when you get to that manufacturers list of specific Core 2 Duo processors they find that the processor they have purchased is not on the supported processor list even though they have purchased a processor stated in the general description.
     
  4. sergeantwupass

    sergeantwupass Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2009
    Messages:
    7
    well the mobo im looking at supports the processor i bought, thank god. Now i just gotta save up the money for it. You guys seem to be geniuses, and i would love to know a few things for building my own rig. Im buying a power supply, case and mobo. But one thing i really would like to know is how to tell how fast a processor is, and what the GHz number means, as well as overclocking, and cache. I read a thing on howstuffworks about processors and how they work, but it never really explained the speed part, instead i learned all the fancy pancy stuff about them.

    My processor specs:
    3.16GHz
    FSB 1333
    L2 Cache 6mb
    PCG 06
    really if theres a forum thread that has this info, that'd be fine
    thanks tho for the help so far, i probly still wouldn't know if you guys hadn't helped
     
  5. Alex Ethridge

    Alex Ethridge

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2000
    Messages:
    8,681
    Two things I do know just a little about:

    1) Don't skimp on the power supply. Cheap power supplies, even with high wattage ratings, can imitate all sorts of spurious problems and can ruin a main board.

    2) Overclocking is popular among gamers. It causes instability and data corruption. If you do any overclocking, don't store anything on the system you care about, not unless you have made an external backup. And be prepared to deal with a crashed system on a regular basis.

    There will be those here who will extol the virtues of their stable, overclocked system. But remember this, processor manufacturers are in a speed war with each other and they have already clocked their processors as fast as they can without losing market share to bad reviews.
     
  6. Rich-M

    Rich-M

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Messages:
    22,417
    Alex,
    As you originally said Win2K speaks from experience on Intel matters for sure and a 965 chipset is not going to work with a 45nm cpu, that has to be the issue. Even many 35 chipset boards will not except with a bios update.
     
  7. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/796098