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Need new router

Discussion in 'Networking' started by metallica5456, Apr 7, 2016.

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  1. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    I currently have a n600 from netgear (solid, I know)

    It's paired with an Edimax n300 extender.

    I am wanting WiFi to cover basement and entire main floor and possibly porch.

    Home is fairly large.

    What would be a good replacement for this?

    I am wanting to REPLACE cause I'm starting to have random "buffering" and slow speeds on WiFi. As well as intermittency.

    Let me know what you guys recommend.

    I might as well go AC at this point....I'm thinking an Asus or Netgear Nighthawk but maybe can keep budget 75-100$?
     
  2. keltic1der

    keltic1der

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    Before you replace it, have you checked for a firmware update? That might resolve your issue. Do you have a budget?
    I personally use a Wireless-AC5300 Tri-Band Gigabit Router: https://www.asus.com/us/Networking/RT-AC5300/ and love it
    and love it, but I know everyone had their personal preference on what they like.
     
  3. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    SWEET! that's what id love to have but its overkill for me hahah

    Id prefer asus or netgear Linksys, TBH.

    I'm ns about the FW but I think its latest. but its still old would FW give range increases too?
     
  4. keltic1der

    keltic1der

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    Some things that can interfere with range:
    1. If Wireless router is to close to a cordless phone using the same frequency as the router
    2. Microwave
    3. Wiring in the walls
    4. Other Wireless signals that are on the same frequency as the router.

    Example: If you current router is using 2.4 Gigahertz and you have a Wireless TV using the same frequency they would interfere with each other. Same thing if you have a cordless phone using 2.4 and it is within 50 feet of the router.

    The firmware may resolve the connectivity issues, but won't increase the range.
     
  5. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    Yea, my point. I do tech support for Comcast's wireless dept for a living. I think its dying and just needs to be replaced ive had it for longgggg time. How much of a range difference would you think it would make for external antennas vs internal antennas?
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Only an anecdote, but my next router will have external antennas. My current TRENDnet 802.11ac router, which seems pretty good, with internal antennas does not give me anywhere near the coverage in my house that my other routers (including a 802.11g not-very-good Belkin model) did.
     
  7. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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  8. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    I'm not going to rehash my statements about wireless fundamentals. I've pretty much covered the debate of coverage vs AP density here:

    https://forums.techguy.org/threads/...etwork-that-shouldnt-be.1156778/#post-9145394

    Wireless engineers no longer focus on coverage for the vast majority of their designs. But instead focus on where the concentration of users will be with the wireless devices along with the applications they are using. The only space where coverage is used is clear open spaces such as outdoors or in warehouses.

    The thing I constantly harp about is this...it doesn't matter how hot the signal is coming out of a wireless router/AP as the client is the limiting factor. If the client can't send back a strong enough signal for the AP to pick up on, then you've wasted your time thinking coverage from the AP is your answer. In addition, the further away you are, the lower your resultant speeds will be due to adjustments in the RF modulation to deal with the weaker signal. This has gross implications on the entire wireless network and why there's also a discussion about a wireless network is only as fast as the slowest device talking on it.

    If your wireless coverage/performance is really that bad, I would look towards using another AP/wireless router at the location where you run into problems before banking on trying a new router which may be able to produce a hotter signal. But overall everyone is limited to the amount of power a WiFi router can transmit based on FCC rules. It comes down to the wireless AP's ability to do auto channel selection and antenna design at the basic level which differentiates one AP from another.
     
  9. metallica5456

    metallica5456 Trusted Advisor Thread Starter

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    I love and hate at the same time, your IN DEPTH explanations, zx10guy. :D I was thinking along those lines...BUT answer this. whats the purpose of these new bad-*** routers with like 6 antennas if its not going to really increase range?
     
  10. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    The purpose of multiple antennas is to both accommodate the increase in spatial streams along with increasing operational reliability. If you or anyone want to dig into some of the technical details behind why RF engineers take the two items I've mentioned into consideration in the engineering of APs, read the following:

    https://meraki.cisco.com/blog/2011/02/mimo-why-multiple-antennas-matter/

    https://djw.cs.washington.edu/papers/mimo_for_dummies.pdf

    I've also mentioned there is a new standard under discussion called 802.11ad. The proposal is to use 60 GHz as the operating frequency for wireless communication. The goal is to increase data rates while at the same time DECREASE range. So why is anyone in their right mind looking to design a new protocol with decreased range? Simple, it solves interference which is probably the number one issue plaguing current wireless networks. Reduction in neighboring RF interference means faster and more reliable operation. Also, it cuts down on the need to constantly expend R&D effort in creating RF modulation techniques to increase operating channel space. Which is another consideration wireless design engineers and administrators have to constantly contend with...co-channel interference.
     
    metallica5456 likes this.
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