1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

need to extend wifi range

Discussion in 'Networking' started by cdavid108, Mar 19, 2014.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. cdavid108

    cdavid108 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    16
    Hi all!

    I have owned my home for 5 years and I've never been able to have wireless signal in any of the bedrooms. I've bought a few new routers that claim to have good range (Belkin F5D8235-4 v2 and an ASUS RT-N66U) but still no luck with either of them. The issue is that I have a cable modem in my office which is close to our main TV and PS4 but that side of the house is an addition and is separated from the rest of the house by a 70 year old block wall.

    Running an ethernet cable from my office to the other side of the house would be a real pain and something that I would like to avoid at almost all cost.

    I get great download speeds with the ASUS router and would like to continue using that as the main modem in my office, but I was thinking about trying one of the available power-line network adaptors (http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Ethernet-Adapter-PLA4101KIT/dp/B00D7GF4FU/ref=dp_ob_title_ce) and setting up a secondary wireless signal for the other side of the house with the Belkin router.

    I'm afraid that I don't know much about setting this up, or if it would even work. I would primarily use this connection to use the iPad and stream Hulu Plus or Netflix to the bedrooms.

    Can anyone give me some advice on using powerline adaptors for the application that I have in mind? Also, I'm looking for a tutorial on how to set up a second wireless signal using the two routers that I have..

    Thanks in advanced for anyone with some helpful advice!!
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    77,186
    First Name:
    Terry
    Depending on the electrical system in your house powerline adapters may work fantastic, so-so, or not at all. Borrow a pair or purchase ones that can be returned and test them.

    JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

    For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router
     
  3. cdavid108

    cdavid108 Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    16
    Thanks, I will order them from Amazon and give them a shot!!
     
  4. John Burns

    John Burns

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 1999
    Messages:
    1,150
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    77,186
    First Name:
    Terry
    A Range Extender is certainly a possibility. However, if it were me dealing with a "70 year old block wall" it would not be the first thing I'd try. Range Extenders are better at solving distance issues than obstacle issues.
     
  6. John Burns

    John Burns

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 1999
    Messages:
    1,150
    Thanks for clarifying that, TerryNet. Mine does only need to go thru several sets of interior walls and are not 70 year old block walls. I apologize for not reading the question thoroughly enough. Follow the experts, cdavid108 - I'm sure they are more knowledgeable than I. Good luck - bet you solve the problem if you can just find the right solution.
     
  7. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    Messages:
    77,186
    First Name:
    Terry
    No need to apologize, John. I certainly miss a fair share of details in threads.
     
  8. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/1122319

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice