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Network installation questions...

Discussion in 'Networking' started by allnodcoms, Apr 24, 2010.

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  1. allnodcoms

    allnodcoms Thread Starter

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    Hi Guys,

    I've got a job to do for a mate of mine, but I'm a developer by trade (got roped in to this because I 'know about computers') and I've got a couple of questions...

    Here's the set up, it's a hotel and he wants Wi-Fi throughout. He's run CAT5 cable to the 'black spots' and connected to routers in these locations. The CAT5 all leads back to the 'main' router in reception where the incoming broadband is. So, there's a router in reception, and 3 more lurking somewhere round the building. Apparently he's done all the hardware stuff...

    I have the simple, 5 minute job of configuring them... :eek:

    Am I right in thinking I can just cable LAN to LAN, and turn off DHCP on the 3 'switch' routers? Any advice is warmly welcomed!

    Secondly, he would like a separate network for the office machines. Can I, using the hardware setup I've been given, lock down one of the routers, leaving the others open to the public, but still share the WAN connection from the main router? I know this is a bit of an ask, but this has been sprung on me a bit and I'm supposed to be doing this tomorrow.

    As always, thanks in advance for any advice you can offer a panicky PHP developer who is in way over his head!

    Cheers

    Danny
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Connect the office router by its WAN port to the main router and the computers connected to it will have the same protection from the rest of the network as from the internet. If it's a wireless router use WPA(2)-PSK encryption with a strong passphrase.

    For the remaining routers ...

    JohnWill's procedure (Aug. 30, 2008) for configuring a secondary router as a switch and, optionally, wireless access point follows.

    Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

    Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

    Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

    Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

    Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

    Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

    Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. [You will not need a cross-over cable if one of the "routers" is a computer.] Leave the WAN port unconnected!

    This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

    For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router

    Remember that some rooms will be able to detect multiple networks, so use channel separation to avoid interference.
     
  3. allnodcoms

    allnodcoms Thread Starter

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    I've just been reading John's post, I wasn't sure about the IP's for the 'switches' as there are going to be three of them, and the separate 'secure' network was worrying me a bit as I'm also supposed to be installing a NIX server that will host the software that I've written for running the business, and this is probably going to be cabled to the 'Office' router / switch.

    On the wireless side, I should just use a separate channel for each switch? There is a massive central stairway running up through the whole building, and the main router is located at the bottom of it. I went round with my iPod touch, doing signal checks, and most of the building can be fed from reception (rooms are all located round this opening and it's primarily timber framed), but the outlying areas, bars and hospitality etc were 'black spots', as was the main office in the cellar (about 8ft of granite will do that).

    Thanks a lot for the speedy reply, I feel a lot more confident now (I was really getting a bit stressed!)... I think I might even have the balls to bill him now :)

    Thanks again,

    Danny
     
  4. allnodcoms

    allnodcoms Thread Starter

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    Just one more quicky. What should I do regarding the DHCP and IP address on the Office / Secure router?
    Do I need to set the default gateway to the IP of the main router?

    Thanks again for your help so far.

    Danny
     
  5. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    The office router needs just an ordinary setup as if it were connected directly to a broadband modem. The only exception to this is that its LAN subnet cannot be the same as the LAN subnet of the main router. For example, if the main router is using LAN addresses 192.168.1.x make sure the office router uses something different, like 192.168.2.x.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    The WAN of the office router should have the Default Gateway be the LAN address of the main router. That's what it will be if you just use a dynamic connection.

    The Default Gateway of devices connected to the office router will be the LAN address of the office router.
     
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