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Network Security with Color Code of Wires

Discussion in 'General Security' started by lexicon, May 29, 2017.

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  1. lexicon

    lexicon Thread Starter

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    Hi all posting a topic after a long time and it's related to network security.
    While taking Networking Classes long time back.
    The Instructor briefed us that we can secure our Network by Changing the color code of the wires, this is a advanced topic and will be explained in detail at the end of the course.
    He Never told us how and what he meant by securing a network by changing the color code.
    As I came to know that 568 A-B are the kinds of standards used for networking cables.
    The Question is still hitting me after so many years time and again. What did he meant by securing a computer network by changing the color code, Was he Bragging ???
     
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  3. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    I don't know what he was talking about. You can't change how you wire a copper Ethernet cable and expect it to work. He may be referring to the color of the outer cable sheath. In various systems I've worked in or with, we typically use the color of the cable to indicate the security level of the data communications going over that segment. This is done as an extra visual check when physically working on the network to help prevent any "cross contamination" issues by inadvertent mis-cabling.

    Now there are systems out there that control network traffic flow between systems at different security classifications. These are used mainly in Federal government systems. They're often referred to as one way throw, unidirectional networks, or data diodes. The systems are set up where there is only data flow in one direction and are built off of fiber optic media where there is only one fiber cable used instead of a pair where the side sending the data is using only the transmit port of the fiber NIC and the receiving side only has the receive port connected. So the basic operation of TCP is broken as there are no hand shake communications involved...(syn/ack).
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2017
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  4. lexicon

    lexicon Thread Starter

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    Hi There,
    Apologies for the delayed response.
    Yes , I do agree with your logic,
    On most of the Networked Environment Admins generally uses labels to specify where the other end of the wire is going , "VPN Server", "Point to Point" , "Secured Server" blah blah,
    Now by changing the color code and removing the label only the person will know what's at the other end other than that i can't think any security measures that can be achieved by changing the color code.

    Thanks
    Lexi
     
  5. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    Changing the color of the cabling and removing the cable labels only shows that someone doesn't know what they're doing. Cables should always be labeled; even with home networks. Granted I've been lazy about labeling the cables in my home network.
     
  6. jdcanfix

    jdcanfix Jim

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    May have been no color code to change, he just wanted you in class everyday. What better way than keeping you curios.
     
  7. zx10guy

    zx10guy Trusted Advisor

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    ^LOL.
     
  8. lexicon

    lexicon Thread Starter

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    That's Correct. I feel doomed....
     
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