Networking Questions

Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Adame24

Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 10, 2008
Messages
31
Can I link two routers. One wireless, and one wired on from out port to in port. Also I'd like to run 4 ethernet cables to my room, is there a line that has 4 in 1 or do I have to run 4 induvidual lines. Which is the best/cheapest type of ethernet, and what is the best wall plate?

Adam
 

TerryNet

Terry
Moderator
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
81,313
You can cascade routers--connect the WAN port of the 2nd to a LAN port of the 1st--or you can configure the 2nd one as an ethernet switch and optionally wireless access point and connect the two routers via LAN ports.

Do you really need to run 4 cables, instead of 1 cable and a 5+ port switch?
 

Adame24

Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 10, 2008
Messages
31
The situation is this; I have my 8 port switch in the basement, and I have a ethernet cable connected to an other wireless router on the 2nd floor. From the main switch I want to run 4 cables to my bedroom on the 3rd floor for my computer, xbox live, and the two others as extra. I want to make the room like nice, and would like to put them in wall plates. What is the best option?

Thanks for the responses.

Adam
 
Joined
Dec 6, 2003
Messages
1,937
How about running one cable to your room on the third floor, then connect it to a switch with however many ports you want.

Courtney
 

Adame24

Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 10, 2008
Messages
31
From the switch how could I put them on wall plates? What is a good switch? I currently have a linksys 8 port workgroup switch and also a linksys wireless G router/4 port workgroup switch.

Adam
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
1,710
Well, you can run two connections over one cable, however, you can't make that Gigabit then. The fastest it'll ever go is 10/100. I strongly suggest one cable and then a 5port switch.
 

TerryNet

Terry
Moderator
Joined
Mar 23, 2005
Messages
81,313
You can run as many cables as you like; we're suggesting one because we see little to no advantage to running more for such a distance. If it were me I'd probably run two, but only use one and keep the other for spare when the first fails.

If you go with the one cable and switch option I don't know enough details about your room to know exactly how to make the setup look really nice, like the wall jacks you want. Perhaps a switch hidden in a closet with short cables to wall jacks. Or build the switch into the wall so that what you see looks like wall jacks. Or put the switch on a small shelf so that it is almost like wall jacks.

Type something like "ethernet wall jacks" (w/o the quotes) into a web search engine and you will find lots of ideas about what jacks and wall plates are available and some ideas of where they can be bought. I have no experience with such and can make no recommendations.

If you stick with brand names any switch you get will probably be a good one.
 

zx10guy

Trusted Advisor
Spam Fighter
Joined
Mar 30, 2008
Messages
6,628
First you need to sit down and think through this network design some more. To summarize what I've been able to gleen from your posts, you have a 8 port switch in the basement. You also have a wireless router with 4 switchports on the first floor. And finally you want to provide network connectivity to 4 devices in your room with the option to pull 2 more as spares for future use. Do I have this right?

So looking at this situation with your original plan, you would only be left with one free port on your 8 port switch in the basement (6 drops to your room and an uplink to the wireless router equals 7 total ports used.) What you have to ask yourself is, are there other areas in the house where I would want to have future LAN drops? Why are you putting the 8 port switch in the basement when there's no mention of any devices down there you are providing network connectivity?

Along with the planning of any future LAN drops, you also have to figure out what type of traffic is going to between devices and where these devices are located. What I mean by this is if you have a PC which is located on the first floor which you do a lot of file transfers to a PC in your room on the second floor, you can easily overwhelm a single uplink connection between the router and the 8 port switch. But this is dependent on if we're talking 100 Mbit or GigE and also the size of the files being moved. The way to fix this is to have the two devices on the same switch and not talking across a single uplink connection. Port to port network communcation within the same switch is always have more bandwidth than going through a single uplink. If this is not possible, the only way to accommodate any network congestion on a single uplink is to increase the number of links between network switches. The only way this would be possible is if you step up to business class managed devices.

So if there is no compelling reason to have the 8 port switch in the basement, I would move the 8 port switch to your room and then pull a single uplink connection to the router. Since internet traffic won't saturate a single uplink connection, you won't have to worry about problems between the router and the switch. This is also assuming there won't be any heavy local traffic between a device connected directly to the router and anything in your room.

As far as wall plates, I punched down most of my house with Leviton products. I used their keystone wall plates and female jacks. If you're punching down the ends yourself, make sure you stay consistent with your wiring scheme. There's T568A and T568B. The Leviton jacks come with a cheap primitive plastic punch down tool. You'll have to clip the excess wire off the edges of the jack. Better punch down tools will automatically trim the excess wire. On the end which plugs into the switch, you can just terminate the end with a male RJ45 plug and connect it straight into the switch. Terminating the other end into a patch panel will allow you greater flexibility in how you can use the LAN drop. For my home network, I did something a bit different. I went ahead and terminated the ends at the switch into RJ45 male plugs. But I also installed a 12 port patch panel which provides analog phone service. If I want to change the function of a LAN drop from network to analog voice, I would just move the jack from the switch and plug it into the patch panel. Also, you will want to label each cable so you're not guessing which cable goes where.
 

Adame24

Thread Starter
Joined
Aug 10, 2008
Messages
31
Thanks for the tips/ideas everyone. The reason I would like to keep the wireless on the first floor is because the house I live in is very old and has plastered walls. I mainly need wireless on the first floor, and the signal diminishes substantially as you go up and down.

Is there any art to wiring ethernet cables? Any good sites to learn? Also what are some good tools that I could get, and where is the place place to get cable?

Thanks,

Adam
 

zx10guy

Trusted Advisor
Spam Fighter
Joined
Mar 30, 2008
Messages
6,628
Plaster walls shouldn't attenuate the signal more than going through regular drywall. You might want to play around with the orientation of the antenna(s) or try using a different channel.

The art in wiring and punching down cables is to be neat. When you punch down cables, you want to try to keep as much of the twist with paired wires as close to the termination as possible. Also keeping all the wires you pull labeled and dressed goes a long way too. Tools wise, you shouldn't need much except a RJ45 crimper if you are looking to terminate some ends using the RJ45 male plugs and a wire cutter/stripper/snips. There's really no need to get a fancing punch down tool especially the impact ones. I terminated probably around 16 to 20 drops and only used the above mentioned tools along with the cheap plastic punch down tool included with the Leviton jacks. You can just go down to your local Home Depot or Lowes and get a spool of Cat5e/6.
 

JohnWill

Retired Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2002
Messages
106,429
Hawking Tech has a number of products that will help you increase your wireless range. The root page is Hawking Hi-Gain™ WiFi Range Extending Products.

Some of the more interesting products are this Hawking [HSB2] Hi-Gain WiFi Signal Booster, which can be used on either end of a wireless connection to boost the signal power.

Another way to increase your signal strength is by the use of hi-gain antennas. You can choose from omni-directional or directional models, here are a some examples.

Hawking [HAI7SIP] Hi-Gain 7dBi Omni-Directional Antenna

Hawking [HAI15SC] Hi-Gain 15dBi Corner Antenna

[HAO14SD] Outdoor Hi-Gain 14dBi Directional Antenna Kit


This is just a sample of available products, many people have hi-gain antennas with similar specifications, but I haven't seen any other suppliers of signal boosters.
 
Status
This thread has been Locked and is not open to further replies. Please start a New Thread if you're having a similar issue. View our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 807,865 other people just like you!

Latest posts

Staff online

Top