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Solved New build cannot boot

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Scudstorm, May 23, 2018.

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  1. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

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    Hi!

    Got a new build. At first I had issues with the system powering itself down right after power on, then goes on a cycle of on/off/on/off on its own. After taking everything apart then putting it back together that problem is mostly gone. Now, when I power on, it shuts down after 2s, waits 2s, then powers on as normal. I'm mentioning this just in case it's relevant.

    However, the mobo is unable to find a bootable device. This is shown both as a red light on the mobo and as "no bootable device found" in the BIOS. The mobo's speaker gives 1 beep which according to the manual means everything is fine. The BIOS does, however, recognize the SSD on which I have Windows installed; it just does not recognize it as a bootable device. I tried putting the SSD into the old build and it works fine there.

    I have tried making a bootable DOS with Rufus. The BIOS recognizes the USB drive as a bootable device, but upon powering up the computer it goes straight to BIOS instead of going to DOS.

    System specs:

    CPU: i3-8100
    Mobo: Gigabyte B360 HD3
    PSU: EVGA 500B (500W)
    RAM: Geil GAPB416GB2400C16DC (8gb x2 kit, in the mobo's compatible list)
    GPU: none (using CPU's integrated graphics)

    Any help is welcome. Hopefully I won't have to RMA the mobo...

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    If the computer was originally shutting down after power on, then presumably this Windows OS is from another computer
    This motherboard is UEFI firmware and it therefore cannot see, as a bootable device a Windows installation that is MBR format
    A UEFI system cannot boot an OS from a NTFS partition, it can read NTFS but must boot from a FAT partition
    The same applies to the USB made with Rufus
    The BIOS may see it as a bootable device but it will not boot from it if Rufus was used to make it in MBR form
     
  3. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

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    Thank you Macboatmaster,

    In Rufus I have the following options:

    MBR partition scheme for BIOS or UEFI
    MBR partition scheme for UEFI
    GPT partition scheme for UEFI

    The first was chosen to make the DOS bootable drive, but FreeDOS is not an option for the other 2 (they can only choose from "ISO image" or "DD image"). Short of buying another copy of Windows, is there anything I could do right now to make sure my mobo is fine?
     
  4. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    If I am understanding your post, your system will now pw ON then reboot and works normally ie you can enter the bios, set time/date, etc.
    As mentioned above, it is never going to boot with a previous windows install unless you follow the procedure outlined at the top of the forum for swapping boards without a clean install. In addition IF you installed windows in legacy mode or non-eufi, this install will only boot IF you turn select legacy mode or non-uefi.

    If the system is running fine, temps and voltages in the bios are normal, then use the microsoft media creation tool to make a bootable or install usb. Note you will need a new windows lic since you cannot use the old windows lic once you change the motherboard. The exception to this is if you have a full retail version of windows; then you can install on whatever motherboard you want as long as it is installed only on one system at a time.
     
  5. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

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    Thank you crjdriver, I will try to provide the relevant info:

    This is correct, although I'm not sure I'd call that "reboot". I'm still worried that this happens, none of my old computers ever did this and I'm fairly certain this is abnormal.

    Or should I say "happened"? I just powered up the PC to check the voltages, and it didn't happen. Maybe the parts are learning how to work together? (This is a concept my dad talked about when building PCs in the 90s, and I've never been sure whether it's real or just an old wives tale) I'm still fairly worried that I'm frying my components somehow.

    They seem fairly normal to my untrained eyes:

    CPU:
    23-24 degrees C
    1.032V

    Mem:
    1.212V

    +5V:
    5.070V

    +12V:
    12.168V

    I got it in a box from a shop shelf when building an older PC. From what I understand, this would be a full retail version, correct?
     
  6. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    If it came in a full box and not just a DVD cover, then it is probably a full retail version.
    No, it is not normal for a system to pw ON then OFF and ON again. It is normal for a motherboard to take a while to POST on the first pw ON however that is not the same thing as pw cycling. I checked the support page for that motherboard and the bios updates do not mention a boot cycle problem.
     
  7. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

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    I got it working! Indeed it was exactly a MBR vs GPT compatibility issue. I wasn't even aware UEFI was a thing. Thank you guys a lot :)

    The boot cycle problem is completely gone for now, I'll try to not worry about it unless it comes back.
     
  8. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    Cheers
    For your information
    UEFI is Unified extensible firmware Interface
    https://www.howtogeek.com/56958/htg-explains-how-uefi-will-replace-the-bios/

    BIOS of course is Basic Input Output System

    UEFI must boot from a medium of whatever sort that has a FAT partition whereas MBR boots from the NTFS file system
    In UEFI firmware user interface (the BIOS screen as was) or in the F11 one time boot key the devices for boot are often shown as prefixed by UEFI or not so prefixed
    Therefore depending on the way the UEFI interface is designed you will see something like this
    https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/21756-boot-usb-drive-windows-10-pc.html
    see the 3rd image down on the page

    The OS drive on a UEFI firmware must be formatted GPT that is Globally Unique Identifier Partition table
    and as I said has a FAT partition - the system partition from which windows loads after Firmware has handed control to the drive and which makes the drive bootable
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...configure-uefigpt-based-hard-drive-partitions

    Thought you may appreciate some basic details
     
  9. Scudstorm

    Scudstorm Thread Starter

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    Thanks! I do appreciate the knowledge :)

    If I understand correctly, if I wanted to be lazy and use the old OS instead of a fresh install, I could do this (along with the contents of crjdriver's mobo swap thread)?

    - Back up contents of old SSD onto another drive
    - Format SSD into GPT (with command prompt -> Diskpart)
    - Restore backup into SSD
    - Put SSD into new build

    Or maybe:

    - Back up contents of old SSD onto another drive
    - Put SSD into new build
    - Install Windows onto SSD and let it do the GPT conversion
    - Restore backup into SSD
     
  10. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    No, it will not work that way. If you read the thread, the procedure starts with the old motherboard installed. You follow the procedure then swap boards. You have already done the swap so it will not work.
    You are going to have to clean install windows unless you really, really want to swap boards again and follow the procedure outlined in the sticky.

    You have the install dvd so it is not a big deal to clean install windows.

    Remember you still have to activate windows even when doing the swap without a clean install.
     
  11. Macboatmaster

    Macboatmaster Trusted Advisor Spam Fighter

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    1. A clean install and then the transfer of your personal data is the easy and best method
    You simply save your personal data from he existing drive using either file backup or a simply copy and paste
    OR you clean install to the new SSD complete the installation
    connect the old SSD and simply move your personal data files NOT the whole user folder.

    2. When Windows 10 and it was the case on 8.1 as well is installed the hardware hash of the computer is recorded and sent to Microsoft servers, where the product key - licence key is registered against the hardware hash
    On YOUR existing Windows 10 installation - the install of 10, be it from the retail DVD or from any install of 10 - upgrade or whatever the installation has registered the hardware hash of THAT old computer against the Windows 10 installation
    Transferring that drive to the new computer will mean that it will have the hardware hash from the old computer

    3. I cannot verify that the suggested method by my colleague will work completely satisfactorily for 10. It certainly would work for 7 and older as those OS did not register a hardware hash.
    If you can activate Windows 10 on the new computer then the activation process will register the new hardware hash.

    4. When Windows 10 is using a Microsoft account but it must be using it on the old computer NOT simply established on the new one, then the activation on different hardware is catered for
    https://support.microsoft.com/en-gb/help/20530/windows-10-reactivating-after-hardware-change

    [/QUOTE]

    5. AOEMI and Easeus both offer transfer to new system but ONLY on their paid for editions.
    NOT on their free or free trial of paid for
    AOEMI
    https://www.backup-utility.com/windows-10/move-hard-drive-to-new-computer-windows-10.html

    EASEUS
    https://www.easeus.com/backup-utility/restore-system-to-dissimilar-hardware.html

    6. It can also be done using Microsoft sysprep - not as easy but free
    Specially designed for the job
    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/wi...p/sysprep--generalize--a-windows-installation

    NOTE do not try any method be it AOEMI, Easeus, Sysprep etc UNTIL you have a complete backup
    Therefore clone using the FREE AOEMI or Easeus and only then attempt the sysprep or the transfer

    8. If it were me and I need to save apps and that includes programs that cannot be easily and free of charge installed on the new drive in the new computer then I would clone the old SSD to the new SSD, remembering to establish the Microsoft account on the installation on the old computer first
    As I said you can do that using the free cloning software
    I would then download the Windows install usb
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10
    following the guide
    Using the tool to create installation media (USB flash drive, DVD, or ISO file) to install Windows 10 on a different PC (click to show more or less information)



    I would then install the new SSD in the new computer AND SEE WHAT HAPPENS.
    If it recognises the drive but will not boot I would boot from the usb - see if that recognises the drive and if so run windows startup repair
    https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/27649-run-startup-repair-windows-10-a.html

    9. As have mentioned if you only need your personal data the easy way is a clean install using the Microsoft link at point 8 and then simply move your data to the new drive

    10. As I said whether my colleagues system works with 10 I do not know, but I would certainly establish the Microsoft account BEFORE attempting any transfer of the system.
     
  12. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    It works fine on win10; just did one yesterday. You still have to activate regardless of whether you use the old install or clean install. The method of activation varies in regard to using a ms account [which I never do] or using an offline account [which is how I always install 10 unless someone really wants a ms account]

    As I said, IF it were me, I would opt for the clean install of windows then restore whatever data files you want from your backup.
     
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