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New build, where to start

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by inept, Nov 1, 2007.

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  1. inept

    inept Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2002
    Messages:
    18
    Current configuration:
    AMD Athlon 850MHz
    Asus AV7-133
    SilenX 450w PSU
    SilenX 80mm case fans X 2
    512 Megs RAM
    60 GB WD hard drive
    80 GB WD hard drive X 2
    Windows 98SE
    ATI Radeon 64MB DDR AGP
    Zoom V90 PCI Faxmodem


    My last build was in May 2000. The reason for doing so again is to build a system capable of video editing. When I built in 2000 it was so simple to select the components. My needs were few and so were the available selections. Now I want more and there is too much and too confusing a selection process.

    My general usage is for spreadsheets and surfing.

    My new endeavor is to begin video capturing from VHS and burn to DVD. I have many original tapes that are no longer available that will require editing before burning.

    1.) I am impressed with the reports on the Antec Sonata III. It appears to reduce noise levels and has a solid power supply. The only objection is the front door.
    2.) I currently have an Asus motherboard and except for the chip set fan dying on me it has caused no problems.
    3.) I understand that the Intel CPU's have a little more power than the AMD's. I have also read that keeping Intel cpu's on Intel boards may reduce conflicts.
    4.) I was thinking along the lines of an Intel E6550 2.33 GHZ or there abouts.
    5.) The motherboard for the above CPU really eludes me. On my current system I planned for future expansion and would like to not limit myself too much this time, future move to a Quad-core for example.
    6.) I would like the motherboard to be able to run Windows 98SE. I know it is not being supported but I have some old software that I run and may use a dual boot system.
    7.) I would like to use Windows XP Home Edition which I own but do not use.
    8.) I am okay with onboard audio. It's probably much better than what I have now.
    9.) RAM - 2-3 GB, which manufacture and speed?
    10.) Video capture hardware? One local vendor suggested a TV card with input ports and software. I do not watch TV when using the computer.
    11.) Cost ??? $1500- $2000. Anything short of that might allow me to purchase a flat panel monitor.
    12.) I do not currently OC my system, but I understand that the new motherboards and cpu's are more tolerant that the older ones.

    I could really use a good jumping off place for this new build. Any good configurations that I might research and refine would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you all in advance.
     
  2. PuppyLinux

    PuppyLinux

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Messages:
    194
    I wish you luck with this; I'm only posting here to point out that many modern motherboards do not support Win9.x, so you might want to keep your current system if you're going to boot Win98SE... You should be able to use most Win9.x era applications in WinXP Home by using Compatibility Mode, but as for BOOTING into Win98SE, you'll probably have to keep your old system close by....
     
  3. SB305

    SB305

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    833
    For the purposes you've specified, you need only a low-end modern PC which you can build for a fraction of your proposed budget.
    The process of copying VHS tapes to DVD can be done only in real-time - which is probably an advantage in that DVD's burned at 1x will probably remain useable longer than those burned at higher speeds. However, don't expect home-burned DVD's to last anywhere near as long as the VHS tapes from which they were copied.
    As stated by PuppyLinux, you may have problems finding a new motherboard which has drivers for Win 98SE.
    As a further option you might take a look at the standalone hard drive media players now available. The ones I've seen come with input and output leads, a remote control and software to capture input from VHS and umpteen other devices - and they're only the size of an external hard drive.
    I've just got one. :D
     
  4. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2001
    Messages:
    39,922
    If you want a system for video editing, you need a high quality cpu. Video editing is cpu intensive not video card intensive.
    You have picked out good parts and you should not have a problem doing what you want to do. You do understand you will need a video capture card as well, correct?

    I use and recommend the hauppauge line of video capture cards. I have an old dual core system that I do quite a bit of video editing/converting vhs tapes and I use a hauppauge pvr-150 card. It works very well. There are cheap video capture cards available however those use software decoding rather than a hardware decoder that is on the card. Cheap video capture cards often drop frames and you will not be happy with one. A good hauppauge card should run you approx $100 or less.

    As for OCing the system, you do understand that it voids your warranty correct?
     
  5. SB305

    SB305

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2007
    Messages:
    833
    I'll try to clarify my previous comments.
    Last year I bought a Pinnacle capture card which came with 3 disks full of software and a 281 page user guide. The program folder occupies more than 4GB of hard drive space on a 2GHz Athlon 64x2 rig with 2GB of dual channel DDR2 on XPSP2..
    It works fine, but for copying and editing old VHS movie tapes and home camcorder tapes without adding all sorts of bells and whistles and fancy effects, it's a lot less hassle to use my Pioneer domestic TV hard drive recorder. That will do simple tasks like editing out commercials and mistakes and splitting movies into chapters in just a few minutes.
    Then, recently I noticed the standalone media players. The one I got is an enclosure, in which you install the hard drive of your choice up to 500 GB. It comes with several sets of input and output leads (including USB) an Ethernet port and even a screwdriver. You can plug it directly into a TV or PC. It has a remote control and will perform the same simple editing functions as the Pioneer but at about a quarter of the purchase price.
    Now, assuming that inept wants only to copy and simply edit old commercial or home-recorded-from-TV VHS tapes to DVD, he's probably going to find that it's not worth the effort. You can't improve on the quality of the original tape and there's a big question mark over how long the burned DVD's will remain playable.
     
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