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New PSU and GPU and my comp is still crashing regularly

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by newfoundmass, Jan 13, 2014.

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  1. newfoundmass

    newfoundmass Thread Starter

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    First, my PC specs...


    CPU- AMD Phenom 2, 3.2ghz 6-core
    PSU- Apevia 680W(old PSU) and Corsair CX750M(new PSU)
    GPU- Radeon 6750HD(old GPU) and GeForce GTX 650TI(new GPU)
    MOBO- Asus Evo AXT (about 4 years old)
    RAM- 2x4GB dual-channel 1600hz corsair


    My issues started when I decided to upgrade my GPU to the GeForce 650TI. I got it, plugged it in and all that goodness, but my games kept crashing. At first, my PC would say that the drivers were crashing. I, being stupid, decided to keep the card and fight through it until the drivers were updated and would be more stable. The crashes didn't stop, however. Then came the BSOD. It's constant and unpredictable. The only time it happens is when I'm gaming, but it can happen once every 5 hours or once every 20 minuets (lately, more frequently). So, I finally was able to afford a new PSU today, as everything I've read said that MUST be the problem. It didn't do anything whatsoever. SO, with the new PSU and new GPU in, I decided to put my old GPU in and see what happened. Logically, taking steps to make sure none of the drivers were overlapping, ect. I assumed it would work. Nope. New PSU and old GPU, still constantly getting blue screens, even at low video settings in the game. I'm not running other programs or background operations. No antivirus, ect. I've been into my BIOS to look at my 12v fluctuation and on the old PSU it's between 11.76 and 12.03 and on the new one it's between 11.97 and 12.03, so the new PSU is quite a bit more stable, but with either installed, the system is blue-screening just as frequently.

    I've been mostly playing "Smite" and also tested this in "Crysis 2" and "Counter Strike: GO" all at max settings. Smite takes the least system resources and is the most infrequent, being anywhere from 3 hours to 10 minuets of play time before crashing. CS:GO, the second most strenuous, didn't crash at all in the approximately 30 minuets of playtime. And Crysis 2 couldn't even get past the sinking ship in the first 5 minuets of the game. I reloaded Crysis 2 and Smite at lower settings but to no avail.

    The only other thing I could think that it is would be my RAM, which is fairly cheap and old. My motherboard has also been the victim of 2 lightning storms that killed the onboard sound and networking and now I've got separate PCI cards for both. Maybe the MOBO is so partially fried it's not delivering power well?
     
  2. replay

    replay

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    Messages:
    5,289
    test your ram with memtest............ if errors are found then there is the the easy solution also alot of the members on this site do not recomend the cx series for gaming (corsair psu)
     
  3. newfoundmass

    newfoundmass Thread Starter

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    I've been running memtest for about 4 hours now and it hasn't come up with anything as of yet, thankfully. I'm leaning toward thinking it may be the MOBO after all. Also, why is the CX series not recommended? Just because it's only 80+ efficiency, or do they blow up easily?
     
  4. Tanis

    Tanis

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    First Name:
    Shane
    Generally the CX series (builder series) are designed for basic system builds and standard desktop PCs, as per Corsairs own website.

    http://www.corsair.com/en/power-sup...50-80-plus-bronze-certified-power-supply.html

    They generally use lower quality parts in order to keep costs down which isn't a problem in a basic system / standard desktop. For a gaming machine the power draw and requirements are generally quite a bit higher (the GPU normally being the biggest single power consuming component in a PC). Because of that, it is generally better to go for more expensive, better quality units that are designed, and are more capable of handling the additional load.

    As you are using an Asus board, download Asus PC Probe and monitor all your temps and voltages at idle and under load where possible. You can get it here under the Utilities subsection on the Asus support website.
     
  5. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    The builder series or cx models are NOT designed for gaming. They are ok for a basic build ie onboard video, running office, email, etc. They are NOT up to the stress of gaming. Corsair does not mfg their own pw supplies; the cx line is mfg by CTW [maker of oem type units] the real corsairs are mfg by seasonic [maker of very high end stuff] In effect you have the equivalent of a dell or hp pw supply.

    Since this is an asus board, install asus probe [available for download from the support page for your mb] With probe running, run something that will stress the system ie prime95, occt, or other stress test app. Post your cpu temp, system temp, 12V, 5V, and 3.3V values here. Also note if the voltages vary under a constant load [prime95 will load the system to 100%] If the 12V rail is going up and down while running prime95, you most likely have found your problem.
     
  6. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Great minds must think alike :D:D
     
  7. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Messages:
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    A few other things to check;

    1 With the system OFF, get a bright light and give the mb a VERY close inspection. Look for any capacitors that look like the pics below.

    2 Is this system overclocked at all?

    3 In your first post, you list corsair ram. Post the exact ram you have installed. Some corsair ram needs a higher vdimm [ram voltage] set in the bios. In addition, post the exact mb you have installed, there are a number of evo boards.

    This may well be your problem. Asus builds fine mb however no mb does well with pw surges, lightning strikes, etc.
     

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