no support 2020 windows 7

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zalmanitzka

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Joined
Sep 9, 2019
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5
Windows 7 won't be supported starting January 2020 so I won't have M.S. updates anymore
But so as long as I have Webroot complete anti virus software & Premium Malwarebytes will I be safe from malware with using windows 7 without the M.S> updates ?
 

Johnny b

John
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Nov 6, 2016
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7,571
Over time, not as safe as if you upgraded to Win 10 and kept current on security updates.
 

flavallee

Frank
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May 12, 2002
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82,081
ZA:

There's no reason for you to jump on "the paranoia bandwagon" and immediately ditch Windows 7 SP1 after January 2020 patch Tuesday.
As long as you keep it properly maintained and keep your installed apps up-to-date and have safe computing habits, you should be able to safely use it for awhile yet.

I will be testing Windows 7 SP1 after January 2020 patch Tuesday to determine if it can continue to receive security updates until October 2021 or longer.
I will be posting my findings in the "Windows 7" section, so keep your eyes open there.

----------------------------------------------------------------
 

Johnny b

John
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Nov 6, 2016
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7,571
Paranoia?, not here :).
But I haven't heard whether the free upgrade to Win10 will still hold for Win 7 users after Win 7 support ends.
There could be a financial benefit to upgrading now rather than later, aside from security.

Technically, that free upgrade offer ended years ago.

I'm hedging my bets on this and have upgraded another of my Win 7 computers to Win 10 even though I hardly ever use Windows on the Internet anymore.
(still dual booting Linux, of course )
 
Joined
Sep 21, 2007
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12,429
Malware is usually an overrated concern. If you seldom download and install new software or open email attachments, then there is less risk.

Security updates primarily addresses security holes found in Windows. Every few months a new security hole/vulnerability is found in a Windows component, and if it is network reachable, then it must be patched. A recent big one is BlueKeep

If the vulnerability was found by a security researcher (a good guy), then the research is handed over to MS and they make a patch. Hackers do their own research and find security vulnerabilities too. And those actually takes a long time before the good guys find out about them. (after the hackers use the vulnerability to code attacks) Those attacks are then spread/sold thru the criminal hacker community and get loaded on to places like cnn.com (an exaggeration, but popular sites get hacked all the time - they are fixed and everything is kept quiet) and attack all visitors who have Windows.

Also security researchers tend to move away from discontinued versions of Windows, because users were given sufficient time and sufficient warnings to upgrade. And it is the hackers who continue on to find security vulnerabilities in discontinued Windows. And that makes Windows 7 easy picking for attackers, because MS no longer make patches.

Network reachable security vulnerabilities do not need you to do a download. Hackers either spray the attack code throughout the net (your router logs will show them), or you step on one visiting a site. And they are invisible. You won't notice a thing until your credit card data is stolen and you get a large invoice The stuff loaded onto your PC won't be found by anti-malware. Because anti-malware rely on malware they can get their hands on, like download sites and so on. Then they can create a malware signature. But the stuff created by hacker/criminal attackers are only spread through direct attacks. Researchers seldom get a chance to analyse those. Web admins who don't know their stuff can let their sites spread infections for months. Smaller web sites like blogs will have no web site administrators at all.

Malware gets a lot of public eyeballs because the anti-malware firms wants to you know about it - their business relies on it. And techsites get all excited by new versions of anti-malware and write reviews about them. Some techsites get commission. And anti-malware testing sites have to be paid to do a test, but they keep the results honest. Business is business. But as I said, if you seldom download software or open email attachments, you don't have to worry much about that part of security.

If you are worried about your downloads, right click on the software, choose Properties and then Signatures. Then click on the certificate and click Details. It ought to say 'the signature is OK', and the certificate should belong to the software vendor. That means the software is intact and is an official distribution. If not, discard the download. If it still worries you, and the vendor publishes a SHA256 hash (a mathematical summary of the bits and bytes), use QuickHash to compute the hash of the download, and compare it to the one published by the software vendor. For example Firefox signs their installers and also publish the SHA hash. Google Chrome only signs their installers. Most software vendors sign their software.

If you wish to continue using Windows 7 after the deadline, don't use Internet Explorer. Install Firefox or Chrome and keep updating them by going to Menu > Help > About. That is the standard method of updating a browser. Browsers are the most vulnerable and most attacked programs. Internet Explorer will fail you very quickly without patches by MS. .
 
Last edited:
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Jan 7, 2020
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68
As others have suggested as long as you keep apps updated you may be ok for a while. However you will fine, as happened with XP, that application developers stop supporting Windows 7 and you will, for example, find that website will report unsupported browser or your Antivirus program will stop receiving updates.

This won't happen overnigh but will happen eventually.
 
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