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Notebook model chronology

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by 10CFR, Dec 21, 2001.

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  1. 10CFR

    10CFR Thread Starter

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    Where, on the net, can I find a chronology of IBM ThinkPad models, and models by other manufacturers. I have been looking at used notebooks and it is confusing, because I don't know how old the various models are, and that is one good place to start when evaluating used equipment.

    I would like to know of any good lists which tell when the various models were developed, i.e., ThinkPad 701C was introduced in March 1995, and had a list price between $3K and $4K, etc.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Max19

    Max19 Account Disabled

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    I've spent a significant amount of time perusing laptop support sites, but I've never seen the type of chronology you're looking for. If you have questions about the specifications of a particular model, you should be able to find that out on the manufacturer's web site regardless of how old the computer is. I don't see why the retail price at the time would matter. A computer's value today has nothing to do with what it sold for 5 years ago. If you think someone is asking too much for an older laptop, post the info here, and we can help you, but don't look at it's original list price to be a guide.
     
  3. Rockn

    Rockn

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    The age, CPU, memory and Hard drive should be your determining factor on how much you should pay for a laptop. Basically a laptop made in 95 would be worth only a few hundred dollars at the most because it is limited in the applications it can run. Look for prices online for the three components above and you will get a pretty good idea of what it should cost.
     
  4. 10CFR

    10CFR Thread Starter

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    Thanks for your responses. Everything each of you said, I already know. The retail price factor was just for my own edification (it is interesting to me).

    For practical uses, what I was looking for is some kind of product line info that would tell me what model came after what model, etc. Take the IBM line, for example, where the numbers don't make sense (one would think, if going by the model numbers, that the 701C was a much newer computer than a model 600, when, in fact, the exact opposite is true).

    Regardless of specs, age does matter. Older stuff has most likely used up more of its viable lifespan. It is inherently worth less, regardless of its specs.

    Certainly the older stuff won't have the capabilities of the newer stuff, but there are a few models that are so close in timeline that it is possible to find an older model that is actually equipped better than a slightly newer one (more memory, larger drives, faster processor installed, etc.). That is where the confusion as to the worth of the product comes in. If the specs are close and one doesn't know which model is the older one, it is possible to get screwed royally on price. The IBM 600, 390, etc. are in this category from what I am seeing for sale refurbished. I wish there was a reference that could tell me which of those models is the newer and the older, etc.

    Thanks again.

    -10CFR
     
  5. Max19

    Max19 Account Disabled

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    Look at the processor type and speed to determine relative age. If the two models have the same CPU, then they're about the same age. There's more to consider when purchasing a laptop than chronological age. I've seen notebooks that were six months old, but they looked like they had been abused (physical external damage). I've also seen laptops that were two years old but looked brand new because the owner only took it on one or two trips every six months.

    "If the specs are close and one doesn't know which model is the older one, it is possible to get screwed royally on price." I don't understand that statement. If the specs are the same, they're no more than 6 months apart in chronological age.

    I believe in the case of those IBM laptops (someone jump in if I'm mistaken), the 300 series and the 600 series are two totally different sets of models. The 600 series is geared toward business users. They're thinner and lighter.

    Personally, I wouldn't buy a used laptop. You have no idea how much abuse it has seen, and they have a significantly shorter lifespan than their desktop counterparts. Considering you can buy a brand new laptop for under $1000, it's not worth it to buy used. It's almost surely out of warranty, and it will cost more to replace parts if they break than it would be to buy a different laptop altogether.
     
  6. 10CFR

    10CFR Thread Starter

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    Thanks, Max19. That was some useful info. I hope I didn't come off as an ignoramus. This is a learning process for me, as all of my (limited) computer experience has been with desktops.

    That is an especially useful point you make regarding the importance of how much use and abuse a system has had. I've been digging through the state surplus where I live and it is about like digging in a dumpster. There are gems to be found but it requires a fair amount of knowledge, experience, and more than a little luck :) to get anything good out of there.

    A laptop is useful for me as I can take my work with me, and also it frees up the shared PC we have in our office.

    I acquired an ancient ThinkPad 701C and it is basically good for simple word-processing tasks as far as I am concerned, and I think it would be highly questionable for me to dump any more money into it to upgrade the memory and add a CD-ROM at this point. I have all of $106 in the whole thing (notebook, external drive, port replicator, power supply and carry case). I think it was worth that, but it would not be worth much more IMHO.

    -10CFR
     
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