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Ntfs?

Discussion in 'Windows XP' started by holtzmjh, Jan 21, 2002.

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  1. holtzmjh

    holtzmjh Thread Starter

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    I am upgrading to Win2K from Win98. I know from observing other threads that Win2k uses NTFS and Win98 uses FAT32. Can someone give me a brief explanation about the difference between NTFS and FAT32 and possible complications I could have when installing Win2k? Also, can I just format the hard drive and do a clean install of Win2k without running into problems? Thanks for all the help!
     
  2. kramnnim

    kramnnim

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    Alot of people recommend a clean install instead of an upgrade. NTFS is more secure and more stable that FAT32, but at least slightly slower. Win9x, Linux, and other OS's cant read NTFS partitions. If you install with FAT32, you can always format to NTFS without any data loss. You cannot convert from NTFS to FAT32 without completely reformatting, though. (Unless you get something like PartitionMagic, which still might not work)
     
  3. holtzmjh

    holtzmjh Thread Starter

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    How do you convert between NTFS and FAT32? Thanks.
     
  4. Dan O

    Dan O

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    You cannot convert a whole drive or partition as kramnnim stated.

    But within Win2k you can copy and paste between NTFS and FATxx as you do normally, using any application. You will not notice a different using either file format. But from Windows 98 or using a boot disk you will not be able to see the NTFS partition.

    In addition to it being more secure NTFS allow you set permission of individual files and use auditing. If you can afford it, I recommend you purchase a second drive and install Win2k on it and use NTFS. Win2k will setup dual boot for you so you will have the best of both worlds as you learn and resolve the new problems.
     
  5. holtzmjh

    holtzmjh Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the great advice. I do have a second drive I am using for back-up. Just to clarify my previous question a bit, when I run the set up program for Win2k will it automatically partition the drive where it is being installed to NTFS or does that have to be done before installing Win2k? Also, if I understand your advice correctly I can just partition my back-up drive with partition software and just tell Win2k during setup to install there? Thanks for all the help!
     
  6. Dan O

    Dan O

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    Win2k installer has a file manager within it. It can do it all for you. Just select the drive and the options you want, such as NTFS and how much of the drive to use.
     
  7. holtzmjh

    holtzmjh Thread Starter

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    Do you have to specify in the bios what drive you want the computer to boot to each time? I really appreciate all of your help!
     
  8. Dan O

    Dan O

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    You're welcome.

    No, normally you always boot from your C: drive which is the default. If you install Win2k on a second drive the system partition will still be on C: (it's just a group of Win2k files on C:\) and the BOOT.INI (a special Win2k file) will point to the second drive, which is usually drive D:. Win2k installer will set it up for you automatically, so you don't have to worry about it.
     
  9. Ken Kasel

    Ken Kasel

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    I have a question that relates to this subject. If you have a Win2K machine using FAT32 and convert to NTFS by using "convert c:/FS:ntfs" are you likely to experience any problems? Anything to be concerned about? Thanks
     
  10. elsinaj

    elsinaj

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    There shouldn't be any problem. I've done it a dozen times and it didn't fail (yet :)

    As with all disk changing products, backup your system first.

    A few advantages of NTFS are compression, encryption, rights

    Compression: You can compress files and directories " on the fly", you mark a directory as compressed and when you copy files to it they are compressed

    encryption: You can mark directories and files as encrypted. Nobody else can read those files, even if they are copied to another computer. Only the recovery agent can decrypt the files.

    rights: you can give various users various rights on files and directories, for example: you can share documents, but only 1 user can change and delete the documents, the others only can read the documents.

    A.J.
     
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