1. Computer problem? Tech Support Guy is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations. Click here to join today! If you're new to Tech Support Guy, we highly recommend that you visit our Guide for New Members.

Nvidia AGP Graphics Card Problem

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by sdi, Oct 26, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Advertisement
  1. sdi

    sdi Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    I have a Medion MD-1567 Pentium 4 that has SIS on board graphics. I put in a Nvidia AGP graphics card (GeForce 3 older gen) with a DVI connected widescreen Hanns-G monitor that is made for 1440x900 resolution. All works OK but I get a crazy flashing screen when I right click on any movie file that is set to view as a thumbnail, when the windows screen appears during start up, when windows desktop first comes up during start up, and also when I bring up the Nvidia control panel or display settings. This isn't the end of the world but I'd like to eliminate if possible. Does anyone think it might be related to drivers loaded for the Sis onboard graphics? I noticed there are Sis651 drivers loaded on the add and remove screen but I'm concerned they might also run the AGP port that the Nvidia driver is plugged into or perhaps control more than just on board graphics. If anyone thinks I could safely remove, please let me know. Also, any other ideas would be appreciated. I've gone as far as reloading windows cleanly, trying other Nvidia drivers but it hasn't eliminated my jumping screen.
     
  2. markomus

    markomus

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    777
    During installation, did you disable the on board video card in BIOS and install the latest drivers for your card?
     
  3. sdi

    sdi Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    As far as I know I did. At this point I've reloaded my system from start. XP loaded the most recent microsoft Nvidia GeForce driver during the windows load. That didn't give me 1440x900 resolution though it was an option in the advanced display set up menu. When I tried to use it, my screen would go black. I then removed the driver windows loaded and put in the Nvidia version 91.47 which was the one I thought I had previously used when things worked correctly. That gives me 1440x900 resolution but my screen flakes out as described above. My bios settings that I believe related to video are as follow:
    In standard CMOS Features page, I have a video line and entered is [EGA/VGA]. Other options are CGA 40/80 and Mono so I believe this is correct. In Advanced Chipset Features page I have AGP Aperature set to 4MB. Under Integrated Peripherals the Init Display First line is set to AGP. I am using an AGP card so believe this is OK. Under PnP/PCI Configuration, PCI/VGA Palette Snoop is disabled and Assign IRQ for VGA is enabled. I don't see any other mentions of VGA or anything specific to the onboard video. Please let me know if any of these settings are incorrect and also if anyone knows about the SIS651 driver and whether it should be removed. Thanks.
     
  4. markomus

    markomus

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2007
    Messages:
    777
    Try opening the AGP Aperture up to 32MB. Everything else looks good (BIOS settings, that is).
     
  5. PuppyLinux

    PuppyLinux

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Messages:
    194
    Just wanted to add a few comments here...

    First of all, you SHOULD have removed the SiS video drivers as part of the process of switching to the nVidia GeForce card... Typically, you'd uninstall the old drivers, reboot the system to ensure Windows had switched to the generic VGA driver (which is embedded within Windows), then shut the system down, add the new AGP card, boot into the CMOS Setup and switch the Init Display First setting to AGP, then saved your settings when exiting the CMOS and rebooted into Windows. Once you got back to the Desktop, you'd have to install the nVidia driver and reboot one more time... The main reason is, you never know when a conflict will occur between old driver components, and newer ones...

    Whatever you do, do NOT try to simply delete the old drivers; you don't know if any of the old driver files are still being used by Windows. Open the Control Panel, open the Add/Remove Programs control, and look for a way to uninstall the SiS video drivers from there. If you DON'T have that option, you MIGHT be able to uninstall them by downloading and installing the CCleaner program (formerly known as "Crap Cleaner"), which you can find on this website:

    http://www.ccleaner.com

    Once you install CCleaner, open it and click on the "Tools" icon you'll see on the left side of the program. Next, click on the Uninstall tool, and look for an option to uninstall the SiS video driver files from there...

    Also, that GeForce3 card most likely has 64MB of RAM on board (BOTH of my GeForce3 cards do), so you should increase the AGP aperture to match that amount...

    For the record, I'm ONLY posting here because a friend saw this thread, and asked me to clarify a few points for him. He doesn't understand why the old video drivers should be uninstalled BEFORE any other changes are made to the system, so I finally stopped trying to explain it to him, and told him to read my post here... Private message for Brian my booze-hound friend: If you STILL don't understand the logic of doing things in the order I've mentioned here after reading this, I think you'd better put the Captain Morgan rum away for a while... :D
     
  6. Sponsor

As Seen On
As Seen On...

Welcome to Tech Support Guy!

Are you looking for the solution to your computer problem? Join our site today to ask your question. This site is completely free -- paid for by advertisers and donations.

If you're not already familiar with forums, watch our Welcome Guide to get started.

Join over 733,556 other people just like you!

Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Short URL to this thread: https://techguy.org/643909

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice