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Outlook 2007 / 2010 Academic

Discussion in 'Business Applications' started by MikeRD, Feb 13, 2013.

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  1. MikeRD

    MikeRD Thread Starter

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    Hi to all and greetings from downunder

    I am slowly building up a stockpile of new released MS software and with the task near complete, I've been searching for a reasonably priced copy of Outlook 2007 or 2010.

    As luck would have it, I've been given a legal copy of both Outlook 2007 and 2010 (both have installs available) but they're academic versions and courtesy of my employment, I don't fit the criteria as laid down by Microsoft.

    I've read a LOT of conflicting comments regarding my entitlements to use the software. Some say it's OK given I won't be using Outlook commercially and as I understand it, when registering the product in Australia, I'm not required to enter any details specific to universities, tertiary institutions etc etc.

    Would someone please give me some guidance as to whether my assumptions from what I've read are correct ? That is, can I use either of these Outlooks without any concerns I'm in breach of the EULAs?

    Kind Regards and thanks

    Mike
     
  2. etaf

    etaf Moderator

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    you have been given an academic version and you are not in the academic sector at all - is that correct ?
     
  3. MikeRD

    MikeRD Thread Starter

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    Hi Wayne

    Yep, that's correct.
     
  4. etaf

    etaf Moderator

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    if your not in the academic sector, then i don't think you can use the product legally - but i'm not an expert

    any particular reason to "stock pile"
     
  5. dvk01

    dvk01 Moderator Malware Specialist

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    There are actually 2 types of academic versions of Microsoft software

    1 type is a full retail version of academic software & second is a version that uses the same activation system as corporate versions do and they have a limited number of keys or number of installs allowed per key. Once that number of keys have been used, then any other activation or install will be rejected.

    type 1 has less restrictions and generally, provided you have a child or other resident in the house attending an educational establishment, that is a primary user on that computer " when the software is installed" satisfies the EULA and the software can continue to be used when the educational course has completed.
    That means that a University student for example can continue to use the software after leaving Uni.
     
  6. 20_2_Many

    20_2_Many

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    Just a thought. If the place of employment purchased the software, and that software was provided under the intent it would be used under conditions of employment (multiple keys or not), then use of the software under the purview of the employer for business purposes should meet the terms. Other uses would not.
     
  7. dvk01

    dvk01 Moderator Malware Specialist

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    All academic software is prohibited under the terms of use from being used in a commercial environment or for any business use. It is only for educational use or home use by a user who is using it under an educational licence.

    The whole aspect of Microsoft licencing is extremely complicated and a total nightmare to understand. It is different in each country to comply with local laws, so what you find on the web relating to USA or UK, might not apply to Australia or New Zealand, who might have either tighter or loser restrictions.
     
  8. MikeRD

    MikeRD Thread Starter

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    Thanks Wayne / Derek

    Wayne, I use the word stockpile in the sense I'm building a library of (MS) 2002 apps (Visio pro 2002 for example as I can't afford the 2010 version) and 2010 package (Office 2010 home student) along with Front page and Publisher (2002).

    The one full app I don't have (i.e. academic version) is outlook 2007 and 2010.

    It would seem I'm unable (legally) to use either of those versions which is a real disappointment.

    Why MS did not include Outlook in the home and student release is mystifying to say the least, ESPECIALLY when one considers how many frewware email programs are out there.

    I guess I'll have to use outlook 2002 from my 2002 legal copy of Office Pro.

    Thanks guys :)

    Mike
     
  9. etaf

    etaf Moderator

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    i have moved a lot of people onto the freeware thunderbird who had previously been using outlook and they are all very happy with it.
    For the same reason you say, they had purchased 2002 full office and when moved to windows 7 - outlook did not work very well, mainly asking for password - which is a known bug. And also to Apacheopenoffice or libraopenoffice

    not tried thunderbird on windows 8 yet
     
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