Outlook 2013 - restoring from .pst & closing Outlook

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armly

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May 31, 2007
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In various places it says to close down Outlook 2013 prior to restoring from a .pst. To simply copy and paste the .pst file into the proper location which is often listed as an email address.

Why is this, and does restoring in this way really apply when restoring Outlook 2013 from earlier versions of Outlook?

I recently imported a .pst file from Outlook 2000 into 2013 (all emails/contacts) and to my amazement, the source 398 MB .pst ballooned to over 1 GB.

Does importing the .pst ( as opposed to copying and pasting while Outlook 2013 is closed) cause such great multiplications in file size of the .pst?
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2012
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It is always good to use the Import option if you want to Import the .pst files from a very older version of Outlook. Outlook 2003 and later versions use a different file format compared to earlier versions of Outlook. That could be the reason why the file size has increased.
 
Joined
May 12, 2014
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Outlook 2000 uses ANSI format for it's PST's. It is a more lightweight than the Unicode format used by 2013, but the Unicode format supports much larger PST's and a bunch of extra performance optimisations (which will increase the size, it's a Space-time tradeoff)

A "copy & paste" would keep it in the older format, while the Import would create a new file in the newer format.
 
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