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PC dies randomly, accompanied by loud fan

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Liam64, Nov 14, 2010.

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  1. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    I've just bought the components for a new PC, and a friend has built it for me. Everything works fine for hours at a time, I can be playing games, browsing the internet, whatever. Then all of a sudden the PC cuts out, exactly as it would in a power cut, except for an almighty fan noise that kicks in and stays on until I hold the power button down to force the power off. When I say an almighty fan noise, I mean the loudest noise I've ever heard a PC make. I thought it was a hair-dryer turning itself on in the room the first time it happened.

    Temperature doesn't seem to be an issue, everything's always around 40 degrees, and before I took it home the guy who built it stress tested it for hours up to 90 degrees without any problem. It has always cut out during web browsing (never whilst gaming) although that's probably just a coincidence.

    Any suggestions? I literally have no clue whatsoever, what with being somewhat PC illiterate. :(

    6GB (3x2GB) Corsair XMS3, DDR3 PC3-12800 (1600) Non-ECC Unbuffered, CAS 9-9-9-24, 1.65V
    Intel Core i7 930 D0 SLBKP Bloomfield 45nm, 2.8 GHz, QPI 4.8GT/s, 8MB Cache, 20x Ratio, 130W, Retail
    1TB Western Digital WD1002FAEX Caviar Black, SATA 6Gb/s, 7200rpm, 64MB Cache, 8 ms
    Asus P6X58D-E, Intel X58, S1366, PCI-E 2.0 (x16), DDR3 2000 (OC), SATA 6Gb/s, SATA RAID, ATX
    Item: Sapphire HD 6870 1GB GDDR5 Dual DVI HDMI Dual Mini Display Port Out PCI-E Graphics Card - Qty: 1
    600W PSU, the only recycled component from my old PC (my first thought was, is the PSU not able to cope?)
     
  2. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    Last night I kept GPU Z running in the background whilst I played a number of games.

    The maximum temperature my card reached was 80 degrees, so I'm assuming overheating isn't an issue? My last card, an 8800 gts, always stayed well over 80 when gaming and I never had a single hitch, artefact or crash.

    Does anyone know what's causing this sort of crash? What's causing a very loud fan to kick in when it dies? :(
     
  3. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Messages:
    38,247
    You are correct the video card temp is fine.
    Start with some basic troubleshooting. Do the following;
    1 Either install asus probe or HWMonitor. Monitor your voltages; specifically 12V, 5V, and 3.3V. Post the results here.
    2 High performance corsair ram needs a higher vdimm set in the bios. Do you have the correct ram voltage set?
    3 If you have the correct vdimm set, run memtest for 1~2hr to see if you have any ram problems.
     
  4. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    Downloaded Asus Probe, and the ones you mentioned seem to stay around the following values:

    3.3V = 3.30

    5V = 5.14

    12V = 11.91

    Is that good or bad? :p I'll try to wrap my head around your last two suggestions now. :)
     
  5. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    I found this option in my bios:

    [​IMG]

    and raised it to 1.5V...

    Although it turned red, and the technophobe in me started getting worried. :D Could that be the problem then? Because if you see on the right of that screen, whatever 'standard' means, it's set to 1.2V. Which from what I've read seems a little low?
     
  6. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    If this is your memory,
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145260
    it needs 1.65V. Having it at 1.2V will cause reboots, bsod, etc.
    It looks to me that what you are setting is chipset voltage; leave that set on auto or whatever it was set on. I believe what you are looking for is under dram bus voltage however read your manual.
     
  7. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    Hmm it says (in both the bios itself and my manual) "According to intel CPU spec, dimms with voltage requirement over 1.65 volt may damage CPU permanently).

    I set it to 1.64, which my bios colour codes as a reassuring green. :D We'll see how that goes.

    Thanks for all the help so far. :)
     
  8. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    I'm still having the same problem with my new vdimm, unfortunately.

    However as soon as my PC died last time, I took the case apart and felt around for signs of heat. The PSU was much hotter than the rest of the computer; hotter than my GPU, CPU, everything. Could that be the cause?

    Do PSUs overheat?
     
  9. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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    Absolutely yes.
     
  10. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    Okay, still having the problem, but we can rule out overheating. It just did The Crash (everything cuts to black, loud fan kicks in) moments after being turned on. I felt around to make sure, but everything was as icy cool as you would expect.

    I'll run memtest tomorrow.
     
  11. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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    You can't rule out overheating. How long do you think it takes an electrical component to overheat? A processor can overheat in 2-3 seconds.

    You need to have the side off the machine and determine which fan is speeding up. If it is the processor cooler fan, then generally there is a problem with the way the processor cooler is attached to the motherboard. If the fan that is speeding up is located in the power supply you can have a weak component internal in the power supply that wouldn't be obvious by feeling the temperature of the power supply case.
     
  12. Liam64

    Liam64 Thread Starter

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    New update!

    It's definitely my GPU fan making the noise. I had my case open last time it happened, and it was definitely the fan in my graphics card making all the racket. I also had a video playing this time, when the monitor went off and the fan kicked in, and the audio from the video carried on playing.

    I couldn't do anything to turn the monitor back on, but my PC seemed to be operating fine in the background.
     
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