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PC Sulking In New Office

Discussion in 'Networking' started by NorsKenR, Jan 25, 2007.

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  1. NorsKenR

    NorsKenR Thread Starter

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    That's the briefest description I could put in the title.

    I have attacked the problem on and off since we moved to our new office in August 2005.

    One, and ONLY one, of our desktop PC's -- Win98SE -- adamantly refuses to connect to the Internet or e-mail since we moved. The others, with help from Comcast, made the adjustment and have been working fine. We had Comcast HighSpeed Internet at the old location and here. We have since gotten a new LinkSys (Cisco Systems) hybrid router. We have cable Ethernet connections to two desktops, a laptop [substituting for the cranky desktop] and a HP LaserJet 5SiMX network printer. (Wireless is disabled for now because I was finding strangers linking in, probably from the shopping center across the street or the Blockbuster lot next door.) The new router, together with the Home Networking Wizard from the Windows Millennium laptop, gave us LAN capability. (We didn't get the new router because we expected it to solve the PC problem; the old one died.)

    After I installed a new Network Everywhere 10/100 Network Adapter card, the "sulking" desktop PC regained access to the router and the local network. I can transfer files between this desktop and our others OK. But it still won't talk to Comcast's Internet or E-mail servers.

    When I enter addresses in the URL line, I always get "Page Not Found" and it sticks garbage into the address string - most often an extra "/" after "http:" and at least one
    "?20%" sequence after the slashes - sometimes replacing all spaces with "?20%" sequences.

    I have tried going into Network Neighborhood Properties and adding back the Microsoft Virtual Private Network Adapter, which also adds NDISWAN and other associated things. Doesn't seem to help.

    The processor is identified in the System Properties window as a "CentaurHauls x86 Model 6 Family 8 Stepping 9". I thought it was a Pentium II or III. I suppose this is meant to be equivalent. Does this ring any specific alarm bells with anyone, (meaning, is there something about CentaurHauls chips I should know)?

    As far as virus/adware/etc. protection is concerned, we used to have Norton Internet Security 2004 and Norton AntiVirus running, but Norton was having problems before we moved and I uninstalled it. As best I can recall, it could still connect to the Web after that - otherwise it wouldn't have been a total surprise to have problems when we moved. If I reinstall Norton, I won't be able to activate - but would the reinstall possibly resupply missing stuff for the environment?

    In case I've obscured the original question with too much data: can anyone suggest what is going on and whether we can get this PC talking to the Web again?

    Thanks to all who pitch in, in advance.
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    First Name:
    Terry
    Narrow the problem with the following.

    To open a Command Window: Start - Run – cmd (command in 98SE) - OK

    To determine a computer's IP address and router's IP address: open a Command Window and type
    ipconfig /all

    The "Gateway" is the router's IP address.

    Now for some troubleshooting. Following is how to use ping to test for communication with your router, the internet, and the internet with symbolic name.

    1. On the PC open a Command window and type
    ping IProuter (where IProuter is the IP address of the router)

    Do you get Replies, or do you get packets lost?

    IF you got replies,
    2. ping 66.94.234.13 (or any other internet address you know and works from another computer)

    Do you get Replies, or do you get packets lost?

    If you got replies,
    3. ping www.yahoo.com (or any other internet name)

    Do you get Replies, or do you get packets lost?

    The ping of the router will work, 'cause you can communicate with it and other computers on your LAN. If the ping of an internet IP address works you have internet access. If, then, the ping of the internet name fails, you have some kind of DNS failure. If all pings work, then you probably have Winsock corruption. Look for a Winsock fix for 98SE; probably can find one on Bob Cerelli's site at www.onecomputerguy.com
     
  3. NorsKenR

    NorsKenR Thread Starter

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    Thanks for your advice. The results were a surprise. The pinging of NUMERIC internet addresses works. I tried it with several, using the translation of the symbolic names that I got by pinging from my WinXP PC. But any symbolic address pinged from the problem Win98SE machine yields "Unknown host".

    Looks very much like DNS failure rather than Winsock corruption. I will see if Cerelli's site has somethng for that, too. Or I'll try Google. But further help would be welcome.
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Terry
    Comparing/contrasting DNS info from the 98SE and the XP ipconfig /all shows what?

    In TCP/IP properties on the XP you probably have 'obtain DNS auto.' Or maybe you specify DNS server(s). See if you can set the 98SE TCP/IP properties similarly--I think on that system there is a 'DNS Configuration' tab.

    If you don't get a solution fairly quickly, post the ipconfigj /all for both computers here. To post you can right click in the command window and select 'select all' and then hit the Enter key. The results are now in the clipboard and you can paste them directly here or into a Notepad file for later copy/paste.
     
  5. NorsKenR

    NorsKenR Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2007
    Messages:
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    On the Win98ME machine, I went into Network Neighborhood\Properties, clicked on the "TCP/IP Protocol" and clicked that "Properties" button. THat gave me the "TCP/IP Properties" window. I clicked on the "DNS Configuration" tab and found it was set to "Disable DNS." Sounds like a good way to get DNS failure to me.

    However, clicking "Enable DNS" means I have to enter a "Host:" value, a "Domain:" value, set up a DNS Server Search Order - (which I've done, using the two DNS Server values that keep showing under "ipconfig /all") - and set up a Domain Suffix Search Order. I have tried but it has not restored DNS function.

    On the WinXPHome machine, I get the following response to "ipconfig /all":

    Windows IP Configuration
    Host Name..................KAR001
    Primary DNS Suffix.......[blank]
    Node Type...................Unknown
    IP Routing Enabled........No
    WINS Proxy Enabled.....No
    DNS Suffix Search List.....hsd1.pa.comcast.net

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    Connection-specific DNS Suffix: hsd1.pa.comcast.net
    Description....: SiS 900-Based PCI Fast Ethernet Adapter

    (I am not giving the rest of the specific addresses for security reasons - who knows who might see them.)

    I tried using the value from "DNS Suffix Search List" in the "Domain Suffix Search Order" and the "Domain:" field at the top, but still no success.

    BTW, when I type a URL into Internet Explorer and press "Enter", it is still changing the URL string from "http://www.comcast.net" to "http:///?20%www.comcast.net" in addition to returning "Page Not Found".

    Thanks for sticking with this. We seem to be making progress a step at a time. What next?
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

    Joined:
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    First Name:
    Terry
    Don't you have your computers connected through a router? Aren't your computers being assigned private IP addresses (like 192.168.1.x or 192.168.0.x) by the router? Even if you are connected directly to the internet with a broadband connection it makes little difference whether anybody knows your public IP address. Your enemies can target you, but most of the crooks out there just continually probe random addresses (actually, probably in sequence) for vulnerabilities.

    Since you didn't show the XP info, we don't know whether your router assigned itself or the actual DNS servers. The trick will be to get the same onto the 98SE. Somebody else can probably specify exactly how; I don't know 98SE because I knew no networking when I used that system.
     
  7. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    By leaving out the IP addresses, you also leave out all the useful information.
     
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