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Pictures fade with time. Best Printer to use?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography & Imaging' started by delta_kilo, Aug 13, 2011.

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  1. delta_kilo

    delta_kilo Thread Starter

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    I've noticed after printing pictures with my inkjet printer the pictures will fade with time. Do pictures from laser printers last any longer? This is especially noticeable on regular non photo quality paper.

    Thanks Dave.
     
  2. Megabite

    Megabite

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    For good pics use manufacturers ink and good photo quality paper...most top brands printers will not fade....I have tested and ink at have price is half price for a reason.

    I have used epson,HP,Cannon.
     
  3. hewee

    hewee

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    Sun light will fade anything so where picture are at has a big effect on how long you can keep them around.
     
  4. Peano

    Peano Banned

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    Yes, laser prints last longer. Send you images to a professional lab that uses high-quality paper. Your prints will have an archival life of 100 years or more under normal (indoor) lighting conditions.
     
  5. paul5

    paul5

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    Good advise above for sure. I have had great success with an 8 cartage Epson capable of making 13 X 19 inch prints. However, most major brands have high end models that will produce excellent prints. Just do be willing to use their inks which can be shopped for online at various costs.

    Depending on the final results you wish to view on the print, various paper surfaces are available. Semi-gloss is a great balance for most images. Just be sure to read the back of the package to note if they state it is archival quality. Most 4-5 star quality options will be archival but only if not viewed under consistently strong direct light. Of course you can use non-glare, frame glass to reduce the UV exposure to a print. Really special prints intended to last 50+ years should be boxed for special viewing.

    All good fortune
     
  6. Noyb

    Noyb Trusted Advisor

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    I just had Wal-Mart print me over 100 4x6 prints for ~$13 .. I can't buy the ink or paper for that.
    For another $1 they would ship them to my front door .. The gas to get them costs more than that and I'm close to a store.
    Not sure what printing process they use .. But they say they're good for 200 years.
     
  7. Peano

    Peano Banned

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    Isn't that an inkjet? I know there's some debate about this, but most seem to think laser prints won't fade as fast as inkjet.
     
  8. wowzer

    wowzer

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    Do the laser color printers make the same quality photos as a high end inkjet? Just curious.

    I use an Epson 7800 and always use their archival paper and ink with no trouble or complaints.

    I also always tell clients to not expose the pictures/prints to direct sunlight for long periods of time.

    Epson says 100 years, Noyb says wallies says 200 years, proper display and some common sense goes along way.

    As side note I was told I would be good for 100 years, chances of that are about 1 in a million... :)
     
  9. Peano

    Peano Banned

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    Here are some comparisons:
    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/color-laser-printers-2,1534-2.html

    I send my stuff out to a pro lab (WHCC or ProDPI) because they always produce excellent results. That frees me from having to think about the technical matter of how they do it. They obviously know how, so I just leave it to them. :)
     
  10. Chuck22

    Chuck22

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    While laser color images are definitely more fade resistant, the images do not have the excellent detail available from the ink jet printers. Dye based inks (used by most ink jet printers) generally do not have very good lightfastness -- that is, they are more subject to fading. Pigment based inks generally have good to excellent lightfastness, meaning that they are much more resistant to fading. Epson inks (archival types), for example, are very fade resistant, especially when behind glass or otherwise not illuminated by sunlight or any light with ultraviolet component.
     
  11. daniel_b2380

    daniel_b2380

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    'nother thing to consider, laser printers are good for text and graphics, BUT - NOT the best for pictures

    to explain,
    print a paragraph of TEXT with a laser and also with an injet,
    the laser will be VERY sharp
    the inkjet will be somewhat 'softer' at the edges

    where the difference really shows though,
    print a PICTURE with a laser and also with an inkjet
    the laser will be VERY sharp
    the inkjet will be somewhat 'softer' at the edges of each color and seem much more pleasing to the eye

    then if you examine them with MAJOR magnification, you will find with the inkjet, the colors have 'run' just the tiniest bit at their 'merge lines' - [ink is wet, a liquid] - makes them more pleasing

    usually the mind can 'SEE' the picture printed with a laser - it's focus is okay - color is okay - but knows something isn't quite right - it's just the way our eyes work - no sharp lines in mother nature
     
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