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Power Outage and Router

Discussion in 'Networking' started by l2rdo, Oct 30, 2011.

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  1. l2rdo

    l2rdo Thread Starter

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    I have a linksys E1000 router. I recently had a power outage and now the router wont do anything. The lights 1-4 and the internet light blink, but the power and connection lights stay off. Ive tried doing hard resets etc. I called the cisco support and they told me that that combination of lights indicates the router is dead. This has happened about 5x now, and each time the same lights blinked, but eventually for some reason or other the router eventually started working.

    Is the router dead? Is there a reason that the router is the only thing that has issues when there is a power outage? The modem and everything else plugged into the surge protector work fine. Is there any kind of router that is less sensitive to power outages?
     
  2. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Sounds at least seriously injured.

    Let the router unplugged for several hours and then try the reset to factory defaults again. Unless that brings it back to (reliable) life replace it.
     
  3. l2rdo

    l2rdo Thread Starter

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    Right now the computer doesnt even read that the router is connected, I assume that would make it impossible to reset to factory defaults?

    I googled power outage and router and I got alot of hits with the same problem. Do routers commonly die during power outages?
     
  4. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    A typical reset to factory defaults procedure is to hold the recessed button for 10 to 20 seconds. Best, of course, to consult your user manual.

    As far as I know few, if any, electronic devices die during power outages. Many are damaged by the surge that commonly accompanies the return of power or that may have preceded and caused the outage.
     
  5. l2rdo

    l2rdo Thread Starter

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    Any way to help prevent damage to these devices? My surge protector doesnt seem to be helping much.
     
  6. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    Surge protectors lose their effectiveness with age and when hit by a surge. You probably need a new one and may need a more robust one (I'm not expert on this, but a $10 one is not going to do much).

    When you are around when the power goes out unplug the surge protector until the power has returned and is apparently stable.

    If a lot of your power outages are predictable (e.g., every other thunder & lightning storm) shut down computers and unplug stuff when you see or hear the storm approaching.
     
  7. l2rdo

    l2rdo Thread Starter

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    Thanks for the help, Ill be buying a new surge protector and hopefully turning off electronics in any future storm. :)
     
  8. w_tom

    w_tom

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    Read what a manufacturer says about their protector. Read the numeric specifications. It does not even claim to protect from typically destructive surges. A protector too close to electronics and too far from earth ground sometimes makes surge damage easier. But again, if it does surge protection, then so many have posted those numbers that claim protection. Nobody can. Even the manufacturer does not claim that protection - except in subjective advertising.


    Once a surge is permitted inside, then that surge goes hunting for earth ground. A best connection to earth is apparently via your modem. A direct lightning strike to utility wires far down the street is a direct strike to all of your appliances. Are all damaged? Of course not. To have damage means the surge must have one incoming wire and another outgoing wire to earth. It is called electricity. Both paths must exist to have damage.

    Every AC appliance was hit by that surge. Only appliances that connected that surge to earth are damaged. Damage exists because you all but invited that surge inside the house to go hunting for earth ground.

    You must earth a surge BEFORE it can enter the building. Earth ground does protection. Either you connect that surge to earth via a wire (cable TV, satellite dish). Or you connect that surge to earth via a 'whole house' protector (AC electric, telephone). Only then is a surge harmlessly absorbed outside. No destructive hunt exists.

    Your telephone line already has a 'whole house' protector installed for free by the telco. Because that type protector is so effective. And that protector cost many times less money. Apparently you do not have a 'whole house' protector on AC electric. Connected low impedance (ie 'less than 10 feet') to single point earth ground. Therefore lightning was all but invited inside to go hunting - destructively.

    More responsible companies sell 'whole house' protectors including Siemens, General Electric, Leviton, Intermatic, ABB, Keison, and Square D. An effective Cutler-Hammer solution sells in both Lowes and Home Depot for less than $50.

    Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Always. How does your existing protector make hundreds of thousands of joules disappear? Simple. It ignores all numbers to claim protection subjectively in advertising. How many joules? Hundreds? Destructive surges are hundreds of thousands of joules. So the near zero protection inside a power strip will make hundreds of thousands of joules just disappear? Yes - because all claims are made only in advertising and via urban myths.

    Protection is always about earth ground. To be part of that protection system, your protector must make a low impedance ('less than 10 foot') connection to earth. It doesn't. That protector may have earthed lightning destructively through 5 modems. Read its specs numbers. Where is the number for protection from each type of surge? Does not exist. Protection exists fictitiously in advertising; not in reality and spec numbers. Spend less money to have the only proven solution - an earthed 'whole house' protector. No reason to have any more damage now that engineering facts are replacing popular hearsay.
     
  9. w_tom

    w_tom

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    How does a millimeter gap in a switch stop what three miles of sky could not? Reality is completely different once we include numbers. Many surges occur without any warning. Just another reason why the only proven solution protects from all destructive surges 24/7.


    How do you disconnect the dishwasher, furnace, and clocks from a surge? You don't. Those and all other appliances need protection. Informed homeowners earth one 'whole house' protector (about $1 per protected appliance) to protect everything from all surges. A least expensive solution also means disconnecting or powering off nothing. How does that millimeter gap stop a surge? How do you know when a surge is coming? Nobody does. And nobody cares once a well proven solution is earthed.
     
  10. TerryNet

    TerryNet Moderator

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    I forgot to mention that power surges over the phone line (dial up or DSL) or coax (cable internet and/or TV) seem to cause more damage than surges over the electric lines. The former are designed for very low voltages and current, so it doesn't take much to wipe out a device via those paths. And, while I have no data, it seems that cable and DSL modems are able to pass on surges with no apparent damage, and you find the damage in the router or a computer's ethernet card.

    Some surge protectors also try to protect coax or phone lines, and maybe the 'whole house' protector does also. But the surest protection is to disconnect the modem from the coax or phone line.
     
  11. w_tom

    w_tom

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    The data. Telephone Central Offices (COs) suffer about 100 surges with each thunderstorm. That is why your town is without phone service for four days after every thunderstorm. They must replace their $multi-million computer.


    Reality. Telcos install the same protection that is also installed for free at every subscriber interface. All homeowners already have superior protection on their telephone and cable installations (if it is installed per code).

    Many surge protection systems have no surge protectors. Because no surge protectors does or claims to protect from typically destructive surges. All effective protection systems have the only thing that does actual protection. A solution that was routinely installed more than 100 years ago so that direct lightning strikes do not cause damage.

    Protection is only and always about where energy dissipates. Either harmlessly outside in earth. Or destructively finds earth via appliances.

    Why does every telephone CO work without damage after 100 surges? Because every incoming wire connects as short as possible to earth. And because that connection to earth is located distant from electronics. In telco COs, that protection system is located up to 50 meters separated from electronics. That separation increases protection.

    But most important for all protection systems is the only item that does the protection. Single point earth ground. The many educated by hearsay and advertising would not know this. Protectors that do not claim to protect from destructive surges (ie power strip) will not even discuss earth ground. And need not even list protection in their numeric specs. They are selling near zero protection that can be hyped into 100% protection by subjective urban myths, advertising, and hearsay.

    The informed homeowner learns by the telco's $multi-million computer is threatened by 100 surges per storm. The same reason why the OP has suffered 5 damaged modems. Rather than installed effective protection, he has a protector adjacent to that modem.

    Why does the telco already install effective protection for all subscribers? Because it is required by code. Because it does superior protection for many times less money. And because it is proven by over 100 years of science.

    The OP apparently does not have one 'whole house' protector connected to the only item that does protection. Single point earth ground. That explains his 5 damaged modems. A surge was permitted to go hunting destructively inside the house. Once inside, nothing stops that destructive hunt. The most common source of all destructive surges is AC electric. AC electric is the source of most damage to appliances on their cable and telephone lines connections. As this engineer learned generations ago by even tracing surge paths. And replacing each damaged semiconductor.

    Protection is always defined by the one item that must absorb hundreds of thousands of joules. Protection is always about where energy dissipates. Always.
     
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