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Solved Power Supply - Compatibility

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by edanexo, Sep 5, 2015.

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  1. edanexo

    edanexo Thread Starter

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    Possibly a noob question, but please help if you know about this.

    When buying a PSU I know I need the right Wattage for compatibility with my components. But is it important (or not) to also know the Amps and Volts and/or size the cables have that will go into the MOBO? Does this have anything to do with ATX/EPS? If so, what is ATX/EPS? I am cluless, please help me understand WHAT is important to know and what isn't. Thank you :)
     
  2. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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    Voltages are standard. Amps matter but mostly on the +12 volt rail(s), that's where most components draw from. Any quality power supply will have the majority of its power on the +12volt rails.

    EPS is an extension of ATX adding extra power, stability, and connectors for higher end systems, they can be used in place of regular ATX power supplies. I think most good ones these days are EPS.

    Wiki for ATX PSU:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_supply_unit_(computer)
     
  3. edanexo

    edanexo Thread Starter

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    Thank you for the concrete reply! I've 3 more questions.
    1. EPS is compatible with ATX but not vice-versa, right?
    2. BOTH the motherboard and the PSU say if they are for an ATX or EPS system?
    3. I just have to check that the Amps on each of the cables from the PSU are the same as the Amps on the motherboard where I will connect them? Also, I've seen some video cards also connect to the PSU, I'm guessing it's the same procedure here?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  4. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    Most [if not all] quality pw supplies use 20+4 and 4+4 atx and aux connectors along with sata pw, molex power, and pci-e connectors. If you have a mb that only uses a 4pin aux connectors, you just split the 4+4.
    You connect more than than the mb to the pw supply; drives, fans, video card, and anything else that might need pw in the case. It sound difficult however the connectors are keyed ie you cannot plug it in incorrectly unless you try real hard. In addition, most pw supplies have labels on the lead/connector ie cpu pw, pcie pw, etc; again it is really hard to get it plugged in wrong.

    If you are replacing a pw supply in a current system, take a few pics of the cables, etc before you remove the old one. If there is a question as to where something goes or how this lead was routed, simply refer to the pic.
     
  5. Triple6

    Triple6 Moderator

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