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Power supply sufficient for Graphics Card?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by zerch, Aug 22, 2008.

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  1. zerch

    zerch Thread Starter

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    Aug 9, 2007
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    Hey guys,

    My computer has one AGP slot open, so I ordered the VisionTek Radeon 2400 Pro 512MB DDR2 AGP Graphics Card from Circuit City.

    I just found out that it needs a 270W supply from my onboard power supply. The card achieves this through a 4-pin molex connector, so I would like to know if my power supply can even support the graphics card.

    On the label, the power supply says:

    Output: Total 295.4W max; +12V, +12Vsp Total 209W max

    If anyone can tell me if my power supply can support my will-be graphics card, I would really appreciate it.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Jones

    Jones

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2005
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    That's a pretty weak PSU. While it may be enough to 'run' the card, I would expect that it would not be enough to run it 'well'.

    Decent PSU's are available to around $50 that would give you more than enough juice to run that card, as well as give you more room for upgrades later on.

    PSU's are typically the one area most new system builders go cheap on, and it tends to cause nothing but problems. There's nothing worse than thousands of dollars of computer hardware running on a bargain bin PSU.

    My suggestion: upgrade to a quality unit with at least 500watts of power. Look for names like Antec, Enermax, Corsair, and Ultra to make sure you're getting a good unit.
     
  3. zerch

    zerch Thread Starter

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    Aug 9, 2007
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    Hey Jones,

    Thank you so much for the response. I was afraid I'd have to wait till the card comes, then return it.

    About getting a new PSU, I am also wondering if I need to look for any type of "compatibility." In other words, is there a level where my computer will fail if I get it hooked up to too much power?

    Thanks once again!
     
  4. Courtneyc

    Courtneyc

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    No, despite how much a power supply is capable of, your system will only use what it needs. A 1000W power supply will work fine on a 100W system. The power supply will find plenty of time to step out and play a game of Spades and get a cup of coffee from Brazil (on a slow flight), but it will still work.

    One note of warning. Before purchasing the power supply, open the box and look for the largest plug. Make sure that plug is in two parts (20-pin and a 4-pin which is usually yellow). You may not need the additional 4 pins.

    Courtney
     
  5. Jones

    Jones

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    That's a good point. I'd make sure to get one with a 24pin connector. Most modern 24-pin PSU's will have the additional 4-pins removable so that you can use the PSU with 20-pin motherboards. This makes newer PSU's backwards compatible.

    Here's what I mean:

    [​IMG]
     
  6. zerch

    zerch Thread Starter

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    Aug 9, 2007
    Messages:
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    Hey Courtney and Jones,

    Thanks for the help. You guys certainly make computers a lot less technical for the novices. I'm pretty sure I understand what to do now.

    Thank you!
     
  7. zerch

    zerch Thread Starter

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2007
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    So far I have my eyes on the Antec Basiq 500W PSU, but I'm not exactly sure if it's the right one for me. It says it is ATX12V Version 2.01 Compliant

    I have a SONY VAIO running Intel Pentium 4, made 4 years ago, but I have no idea what ATX version it is, so I wonder, is there a way to tell? Does my SONY need to be ATX 2.01 as well, or will an earlier version still be compatible with this PSU?

    My second question is, are there any numbers that need to be consistent with a replacement PSU? (i.e, the input voltage, the output voltage?)

    Thank you so much!
     
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