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PSU pins: May I connect 20 to 24 ?

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by bilibom, Dec 16, 2006.

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  1. bilibom

    bilibom Banned Thread Starter

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    I m trying connect a psu to a mobo.
    But mobo has 24 pins while psu's cable has 20 pins! Can I do the connection? Is there any danger?
    If yes, which 4 pins should I let free?
     
  2. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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  3. JohnWill

    JohnWill Retired Moderator

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    In truth, what you really should have is a P/S that has a 24 pin connector. :)
     
  4. bilibom

    bilibom Banned Thread Starter

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    I made the connection(20 on 24) and pc seems to work properly.
    May I stay as I m ?
     
  5. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver

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    I hope you aren't running a high end machine. If you are only running the basics, maybe you will be OK. I wouldn't do it. Parts cost too much to take the chance.
     
  6. pinntech

    pinntech

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    Actually… most of the newer motherboards will support either PSU! You will need to refer to your owners manual or post your motherboard manufacturer and board model number with revision number(s)!
     
  7. Skivvywaver

    Skivvywaver

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    My board will run with a 20 pin which is why I said "maybe for a basic" machine. ;)

    If I plugged a 20 pin into this thing I would be very afraid to push the power button. :eek:
     
  8. Rich-M

    Rich-M

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  9. bilibom

    bilibom Banned Thread Starter

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    I dont see any clear conclusion...

    System is

    A64 3200+
    Kingston 512 DDR
    DVD-R
    floppy
    HD ide 80GB
    psu 350W

    Manual doesnt say something bad about 20pins.
    Should I buy an adaptor-cable?
     
  10. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    If you want to do the job correctly, get a 24pin power supply. Sometimes you can "get away with" using a 20-24pin adapter, however I never recommend doing so.

    The basic reason is the board mfg made the board with 24pin for a reason; it needs the extra power provided by dual 12V rails. What an adapter does is split the existing single 12V into two. You get no more power this way.

    In short buy the correct power supply for your system.
     
  11. brite750

    brite750

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    I have a similar system i think (A64 3500+ 939), but my mb was only 20pin, i guess it really depnds on what psu you have and what amps on 12 volt you have, 350watt sounds a little light to begin with.
    If mb manual doesnt warn against it (some mb let you do a 20pin in a 24 socket) and you are not using this pc as a gamer system (long hrs at 100% use), and your pc doesnt mess up (random shut-downs, etc.), then maybe, just maybe you are alright, but thats a lot of maybes.
    If it was me, id be thinking about a quality psu replacement with 24pin in the near future.
    BTW what graphics card, PSU make/model do you have?
     
  12. bilibom

    bilibom Banned Thread Starter

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    - crjdriver, so u tell me not just buy an 20 to 24 adaptor but buy a new psu!
    Well, I dont think this worths because its not my main system, I builted with older materials and now I m thinking what to do with it, maybe sell it...
    But so long system seems works as it is, without any adaptor. U think that after some hours of use it will maybe blow up?...In another forum 3-4 users told me theres no problem to stay as I m.

    -brite750, I think 350W are enough for this system. Manual doesnt warns about 20 pins, just mention it as you see in the image. (PSU is noname but works good silently and continuesly for 27 months. Vga is onboard).[​IMG]
    How can I know if the 20-pin power plug can provide at least 15A on +12V ?
     
  13. crjdriver

    crjdriver Moderator

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    There is always more than one way to do something. You choose; do you want to do it correctly or do you just "Want to get by" It is up to you. As I posted the mb mfg put a 24pin connector on there for a reason; it needs the extra power provided by the dual 12V rails.
     
  14. brite750

    brite750

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    it should have all that info on the power supply, if the psu has no label, then that would be weird, any electrical device is by law suppose to have certain info printed on it. Like i said 350watt is a little light to begin with, only because many cheap psu dont every get anywhere near 350watt before they crap out, a good quality psu will easily develope the rated wattage, cheap ones you are on your own. I would go by your manaul, if you current psu says 350watts and has at least 15amps on the 12volt rail then you have met the min requirement.
     
  15. win2kpro

    win2kpro

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    I believe the best way for you to make a decision regarding your power supply is to read why the 24 pin motherboard standard was adopted in ATX Motherboard Standard version 2.2. Read the 3rd line listed under REVISION HISTORY at the beginning of the document, then read section 4.1. The 24 pin motherboard connector standard was adopted to support additional power for PCI-e video cards.

    http://www.formfactors.org/developer/specs/atx2_2.pdf

    If your board manufacturer states that you can use a 20 pin connector if you meet the requirements they specified, then I would not argue with the manufacturer since they know more about the boards they produce than anyone else. Be sure and carefully read the section from the motherboard manual you posted, especially paragraphs 4 and 5 of the section you posted.

    You may also want to read "Power Supply Myths Exposed" at the PCPOWER&COOLING,INC. website;

    http://www.pcpower.com/technology/myths/#8

    The responsibility is yours and yours alone as to the PSU requirements for your specific machine.
     
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